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Article: Geographic range and habitat reconstructions shed light on palaeotropical intercontinental disjunction and regional diversification patterns in Artabotrys (Annonaceae)

TitleGeographic range and habitat reconstructions shed light on palaeotropical intercontinental disjunction and regional diversification patterns in Artabotrys (Annonaceae)
Authors
KeywordsAfrican-Asian disjunction
Annonaceae
Artabotrys
habitat reconstruction
historical biogeography
Issue Date2019
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-2699
Citation
Journal of Biogeography, 2019, v. 46 n. 12, p. 2690-2705 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: The biogeographical and habitat history of the species-rich angiosperm genus Artabotrys is reconstructed to assess hypotheses relating to processes that underlie palaeotropical intercontinental disjunction (PID) and regional diversification patterns. Location: Palaeotropics. Taxon: Artabotrys (Annonaceae). Methods: Phylogenetic relationships were estimated based on 53 Artabotrys species, using four chloroplast and 10 nuclear markers (c. 15.7 kb). Divergence times were estimated using two fossil calibrations and an uncorrelated lognormal relaxed clock model. Ancestral range estimation was performed under a dispersal–extinction–cladogenesis model while ancestral habitat reconstruction was conducted using the BAYAREALIKE model. Results: Artabotrys is unequivocally monophyletic, with a species-rich main Artabotrys clade (MAC) comprising distinct African and Asian sister clades, and an early divergent grade (EDG) comprising two African species. An ancestral range in Africa is inferred, with a single dispersal to Asia. The PID at the MAC crown occurred in the Miocene. A broad habitat tolerance spanning rain forests and seasonally dry forests/savannas was inferred at the MAC stem and crown nodes. Several shifts from rain forests to seasonally dry habitats were inferred, but there is no indication of a reverse transition. Main conclusions: The most plausible explanation for the PID involves overland migration across Arabia in the Miocene, prior to subsequent climate deterioration. Long-standing differences in climatic niche may have resulted in a significant yet porous biogeographical divide at the Isthmus of Kra, but Wallace's line does not reflect differences in climatic niches. Niche conservatism is an underlying pattern in Artabotrys, with local niche shifts occurring rather recently. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280130
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.154
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.807

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, J-
dc.contributor.authorThomas, DC-
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, RMK-
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-06T02:01:28Z-
dc.date.available2020-01-06T02:01:28Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biogeography, 2019, v. 46 n. 12, p. 2690-2705-
dc.identifier.issn0305-0270-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280130-
dc.description.abstractAim: The biogeographical and habitat history of the species-rich angiosperm genus Artabotrys is reconstructed to assess hypotheses relating to processes that underlie palaeotropical intercontinental disjunction (PID) and regional diversification patterns. Location: Palaeotropics. Taxon: Artabotrys (Annonaceae). Methods: Phylogenetic relationships were estimated based on 53 Artabotrys species, using four chloroplast and 10 nuclear markers (c. 15.7 kb). Divergence times were estimated using two fossil calibrations and an uncorrelated lognormal relaxed clock model. Ancestral range estimation was performed under a dispersal–extinction–cladogenesis model while ancestral habitat reconstruction was conducted using the BAYAREALIKE model. Results: Artabotrys is unequivocally monophyletic, with a species-rich main Artabotrys clade (MAC) comprising distinct African and Asian sister clades, and an early divergent grade (EDG) comprising two African species. An ancestral range in Africa is inferred, with a single dispersal to Asia. The PID at the MAC crown occurred in the Miocene. A broad habitat tolerance spanning rain forests and seasonally dry forests/savannas was inferred at the MAC stem and crown nodes. Several shifts from rain forests to seasonally dry habitats were inferred, but there is no indication of a reverse transition. Main conclusions: The most plausible explanation for the PID involves overland migration across Arabia in the Miocene, prior to subsequent climate deterioration. Long-standing differences in climatic niche may have resulted in a significant yet porous biogeographical divide at the Isthmus of Kra, but Wallace's line does not reflect differences in climatic niches. Niche conservatism is an underlying pattern in Artabotrys, with local niche shifts occurring rather recently. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-2699-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biogeography-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectAfrican-Asian disjunction-
dc.subjectAnnonaceae-
dc.subjectArtabotrys-
dc.subjecthabitat reconstruction-
dc.subjecthistorical biogeography-
dc.titleGeographic range and habitat reconstructions shed light on palaeotropical intercontinental disjunction and regional diversification patterns in Artabotrys (Annonaceae)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, RMK: saunders@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, RMK=rp00774-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jbi.13703-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85073818596-
dc.identifier.hkuros308904-
dc.identifier.volume46-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage2690-
dc.identifier.epage2705-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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