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Article: The respiratory tract microbiome and its relationship to lung cancer and environmental exposures found in rural China

TitleThe respiratory tract microbiome and its relationship to lung cancer and environmental exposures found in rural China
Authors
Keywordslung
pulmonary
cancer
bacteria
coal
Issue Date2019
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/10009058
Citation
Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, 2019, v. 60 n. 7, p. 617-623 How to Cite?
AbstractWe previously reported that bacterial diversity in sputum samples from never‐smoking women in rural China varied by lung cancer status and household air pollution (HAP) exposure type. Here, we expand on our associations between environmental exposures and respiratory tract microbiota with an additional 90 never‐smoking women from Xuanwei, China. DNA from sputum samples of cases (n = 45) and controls (n = 45) was extracted using a multistep enzymatic and physical lysis, followed by a standardized clean up. V1–V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes were Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified. Purified amplicons were sequenced by 454 FLX Titanium pyrosequencing and high‐quality sequences were evaluated for diversity and taxonomic membership. In our population of never‐smokers, increased risk of lung cancer was associated with lower alpha diversity compared to higher alpha diversity (Shannon: ORhigh = 1.00 [reference], ORmedium = 3.84 [1.02–14.48], ORlow = 3.78 [1.03–13.82]; observed species: ORhigh = 1.00 [reference], ORmedium = 2.37 [0.67–8.48], ORlow = 2.01 [0.58–6.97]; Phylogenetic Diversity (PD) whole tree: ORhigh = 1.00 [reference], ORmedium = 3.04 [0.85–10.92], ORlow = 2.53 [0.72–8.96]), as well as a decreased relative abundance of Fusobacteria (ORhigh = 1.00 [reference], ORmedium = 1.24 [0.42–3.66], ORlow = 2.01 [0.63–6.44], ptrend = 0.03). Increasing alpha diversity was associated with smoky coal use compared to clean fuel use among all subjects (observed species, P = 0.001; PD whole tree, P = 0.006; Shannon, P = 0.0002), as well as cases (observed species, P = 0.02; PD whole tree, P = 0.03; Shannon, P = 0.03) and controls (observed species, P = 0.01; PD whole tree, P = 0.05; Shannon, P = 0.002). Increased diversity was also associated with presence of livestock (observed species, P = 0.02; PD whole tree, P = 0.02; Shannon, P = 0.03) in the home for cases. Our study is the first to report that decreased microbial diversity is associated with risk of lung cancer. Larger studies are necessary to elucidate the direct and indirect effects attributed to the disease‐specific, HAP‐specific, and animal‐specific associations. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 2019. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
DescriptionLink to Free access
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279687
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.254
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.326

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHosgood III, HD-
dc.contributor.authorMongodin, EF-
dc.contributor.authorWan, Y-
dc.contributor.authorHua, X-
dc.contributor.authorRothman, N-
dc.contributor.authorHu, W-
dc.contributor.authorVermeulen, R-
dc.contributor.authorSeow, WJ-
dc.contributor.authorRohan, T-
dc.contributor.authorXu, J-
dc.contributor.authorLi, J-
dc.contributor.authorHe, J-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorYang, K-
dc.contributor.authorWu, GP-
dc.contributor.authorWei, FS-
dc.contributor.authorShi, J-
dc.contributor.authorSapkota, AR-
dc.contributor.authorLan, Q-
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-09T06:44:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-12-09T06:44:28Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, 2019, v. 60 n. 7, p. 617-623-
dc.identifier.issn0893-6692-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279687-
dc.descriptionLink to Free access-
dc.description.abstractWe previously reported that bacterial diversity in sputum samples from never‐smoking women in rural China varied by lung cancer status and household air pollution (HAP) exposure type. Here, we expand on our associations between environmental exposures and respiratory tract microbiota with an additional 90 never‐smoking women from Xuanwei, China. DNA from sputum samples of cases (n = 45) and controls (n = 45) was extracted using a multistep enzymatic and physical lysis, followed by a standardized clean up. V1–V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes were Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified. Purified amplicons were sequenced by 454 FLX Titanium pyrosequencing and high‐quality sequences were evaluated for diversity and taxonomic membership. In our population of never‐smokers, increased risk of lung cancer was associated with lower alpha diversity compared to higher alpha diversity (Shannon: ORhigh = 1.00 [reference], ORmedium = 3.84 [1.02–14.48], ORlow = 3.78 [1.03–13.82]; observed species: ORhigh = 1.00 [reference], ORmedium = 2.37 [0.67–8.48], ORlow = 2.01 [0.58–6.97]; Phylogenetic Diversity (PD) whole tree: ORhigh = 1.00 [reference], ORmedium = 3.04 [0.85–10.92], ORlow = 2.53 [0.72–8.96]), as well as a decreased relative abundance of Fusobacteria (ORhigh = 1.00 [reference], ORmedium = 1.24 [0.42–3.66], ORlow = 2.01 [0.63–6.44], ptrend = 0.03). Increasing alpha diversity was associated with smoky coal use compared to clean fuel use among all subjects (observed species, P = 0.001; PD whole tree, P = 0.006; Shannon, P = 0.0002), as well as cases (observed species, P = 0.02; PD whole tree, P = 0.03; Shannon, P = 0.03) and controls (observed species, P = 0.01; PD whole tree, P = 0.05; Shannon, P = 0.002). Increased diversity was also associated with presence of livestock (observed species, P = 0.02; PD whole tree, P = 0.02; Shannon, P = 0.03) in the home for cases. Our study is the first to report that decreased microbial diversity is associated with risk of lung cancer. Larger studies are necessary to elucidate the direct and indirect effects attributed to the disease‐specific, HAP‐specific, and animal‐specific associations. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 2019. © 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/10009058-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental and Molecular Mutagenesis-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectlung-
dc.subjectpulmonary-
dc.subjectcancer-
dc.subjectbacteria-
dc.subjectcoal-
dc.titleThe respiratory tract microbiome and its relationship to lung cancer and environmental exposures found in rural China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXu, J: xusunjun@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/em.22291-
dc.identifier.pmid30942501-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85065498605-
dc.identifier.hkuros308635-
dc.identifier.volume60-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage617-
dc.identifier.epage623-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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