File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: The influence of undetermined deaths on suicides in Shanghai, China

TitleThe influence of undetermined deaths on suicides in Shanghai, China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Suicide
Underreporting
Undetermined death
Issue Date2018
PublisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127
Citation
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2018, v. 54 n. 1, p. 111-119 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE: In global forensic practice, some suicides were misclassified as undetermined deaths, leading to suicide underreporting. In this study, we aimed to explore the influence of undetermined deaths on suicides in Shanghai, China. METHODS: The police records on suicide verdicts and undetermined deaths in Pudong, Shanghai, from 2004 to 2016 were used. In this study, undetermined deaths have been classified into three levels of suicide possibilities namely, probable, possible, and highly unlikely. Probable suicides were presumed as misclassified suicides. Poisson regression was used to calculate the rate ratio ('RR') of probable suicides compared to suicide verdicts. Poisson regression was also used to calculate the annual percentage change ('APC') of the original suicide rates (crude suicide rates based on the suicide verdicts) and adjusted suicide rates (crude suicide rates based on the suicide verdicts and probable suicides). RESULTS: Among the 1,318 underdetermine deaths, 560 (42.5%) were classified as probable suicides. The overall RR was 0.23 (95% CI 0.21-0.26): 0.15 (0.13-0.17) for the locals' RR and 0.22 (0.19-0.26) for the migrants' RR. The APCs of the original and adjusted suicide rates were - 2.0 (- 3.1 to - 0.9) and - 2.9 (- 3.8 to - 2.0), respectively, for the overall population. CONCLUSIONS: The number of suicides could be 23% higher than the reported cases. Suicides were more likely to be underreported in migrants than in the locals. Thus, it is important to improve suicide monitoring and the surveillance systems in China.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279228
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.335
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.095

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLI, F-
dc.contributor.authorLu, X-
dc.contributor.authorOu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:21:59Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:21:59Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2018, v. 54 n. 1, p. 111-119-
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279228-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: In global forensic practice, some suicides were misclassified as undetermined deaths, leading to suicide underreporting. In this study, we aimed to explore the influence of undetermined deaths on suicides in Shanghai, China. METHODS: The police records on suicide verdicts and undetermined deaths in Pudong, Shanghai, from 2004 to 2016 were used. In this study, undetermined deaths have been classified into three levels of suicide possibilities namely, probable, possible, and highly unlikely. Probable suicides were presumed as misclassified suicides. Poisson regression was used to calculate the rate ratio ('RR') of probable suicides compared to suicide verdicts. Poisson regression was also used to calculate the annual percentage change ('APC') of the original suicide rates (crude suicide rates based on the suicide verdicts) and adjusted suicide rates (crude suicide rates based on the suicide verdicts and probable suicides). RESULTS: Among the 1,318 underdetermine deaths, 560 (42.5%) were classified as probable suicides. The overall RR was 0.23 (95% CI 0.21-0.26): 0.15 (0.13-0.17) for the locals' RR and 0.22 (0.19-0.26) for the migrants' RR. The APCs of the original and adjusted suicide rates were - 2.0 (- 3.1 to - 0.9) and - 2.9 (- 3.8 to - 2.0), respectively, for the overall population. CONCLUSIONS: The number of suicides could be 23% higher than the reported cases. Suicides were more likely to be underreported in migrants than in the locals. Thus, it is important to improve suicide monitoring and the surveillance systems in China.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127-
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectSuicide-
dc.subjectUnderreporting-
dc.subjectUndetermined death-
dc.titleThe influence of undetermined deaths on suicides in Shanghai, China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-018-1596-9-
dc.identifier.pmid30167734-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85053236702-
dc.identifier.hkuros307952-
dc.identifier.volume54-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage111-
dc.identifier.epage119-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats