File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The place/s of Tagalog in Hong Kong’s Central district: Negotiating center-periphery dynamics

TitleThe place/s of Tagalog in Hong Kong’s Central district: Negotiating center-periphery dynamics
Authors
Keywordscenter-periphery dynamics
Filipino domestic workers
Hong Kong
sociolinguistic scales and Tagalog
Issue Date2019
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.benjamins.com/catalog/ll
Citation
Linguistic Landscape, 2019, v. 5 n. 2, p. 160-178 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Central district is the government, financial, and business center of Hong Kong. Yet, on Sundays, it turns temporarily into a space densely occupied by migrant domestic workers from the Philippines. It is then that Tagalog emerges as a valuable linguistic resource in the center of Hong Kong, primarily as it is used on commercial signage as well as by speakers of other languages who see the presence of Filipinos – predominantly female domestic workers – as a business opportunity. Other signs in central Hong Kong that include Tagalog are regulatory, indexing the same Filipinos as low status domestic workers. Using the key concepts of sociolinguistic scales (Blommaert, 2007) and center-periphery dynamics (Pietikäinen & Kelly-Holmes, 2013), I analyze the underlying forces relevant to Tagalog’s (and hence its speakers) symbolic centering and peripheralization in Hong Kong’s semiotic landscape.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278547
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuinto, N-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:09:32Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:09:32Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationLinguistic Landscape, 2019, v. 5 n. 2, p. 160-178-
dc.identifier.issn2214-9953-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278547-
dc.description.abstractThe Central district is the government, financial, and business center of Hong Kong. Yet, on Sundays, it turns temporarily into a space densely occupied by migrant domestic workers from the Philippines. It is then that Tagalog emerges as a valuable linguistic resource in the center of Hong Kong, primarily as it is used on commercial signage as well as by speakers of other languages who see the presence of Filipinos – predominantly female domestic workers – as a business opportunity. Other signs in central Hong Kong that include Tagalog are regulatory, indexing the same Filipinos as low status domestic workers. Using the key concepts of sociolinguistic scales (Blommaert, 2007) and center-periphery dynamics (Pietikäinen & Kelly-Holmes, 2013), I analyze the underlying forces relevant to Tagalog’s (and hence its speakers) symbolic centering and peripheralization in Hong Kong’s semiotic landscape.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.benjamins.com/catalog/ll-
dc.relation.ispartofLinguistic Landscape-
dc.rightsLinguistic Landscape. Copyright © John Benjamins Publishing Co.-
dc.rightsReaders of post-print must contact John Benjamins Publishing for further reprinting or re-use-
dc.subjectcenter-periphery dynamics-
dc.subjectFilipino domestic workers-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectsociolinguistic scales and Tagalog-
dc.titleThe place/s of Tagalog in Hong Kong’s Central district: Negotiating center-periphery dynamics-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGuinto, N: nguinto@slsu.edu.ph-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/ll.18024.gui-
dc.identifier.hkuros308071-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage160-
dc.identifier.epage178-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats