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Article: Diagnostic use of ultrasonography in carpal tunnel syndrome and its correlation with the Chinese version of boston carpal tunnel questionnaire

TitleDiagnostic use of ultrasonography in carpal tunnel syndrome and its correlation with the Chinese version of boston carpal tunnel questionnaire
Authors
KeywordsBoston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire
carpal tunnel syndrome
factor analysis
nerve conduction studies
ultrasound
Issue Date2019
PublisherWolters Kluwer - Medknow Publications and Media Pvt. Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jmuonline.org
Citation
Journal of Medical Ultrasound, 2019, v. 27 n. 3, p. 124-129 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: There were yet no correlation studies performed between ultrasound and the Chinese version of Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (C-BCTQ). Besides, controversies still remain regarding the correlation between ultrasound and different language versions of BCTQ. Purpose of the Study: To examine whether ultrasound can (i) reflect symptom severity and/or functional status, (ii) differentiate primary/secondary symptom, and (iii) correlate with subscale items in C-BCTQ. Methods: Forty-two Chinese female individuals (aged 58.84 ± 9.02 years) with 73 hands were enrolled in the study. Factor analysis was used to identify the hidden factors of C-BCTQ. Correlations were examined between hidden factors, relevant subscale items of C-BCTQ, and ultrasound. Results: Three factors were identified as Factor One (functional status, 36.534%), Two (sensory symptoms, 15.057%) and Three (pain, 11.867%), with 63.458% of total variance explained in C-BCTQ. All the ultrasound parameters were positively correlated with Factor One (r = 0.29-0.411, P < 0.05), while no correlations were found with Factor Two and Three. Meanwhile, correlation between wrist cross-sectional area and functional status scale (FSS) was also found (W-CSA, r = 0.266, P = 0.023), whereas no correlation was found with symptom severity scale (SSS), subscales of primary symptom (Paresthesia) and secondary symptom (pain) related items in C-BCTQ. Conclusion: Morphological information via ultrasound can reflect the impact on functionality that carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) exerted. However, it can be used neither to describe symptom severity nor differentiate primary/secondary symptom of CTS.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278216
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.111

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDENG, X-
dc.contributor.authorCHAU, LH-
dc.contributor.authorCHIU, SY-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KP-
dc.contributor.authorHu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorIp, WY-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-04T08:09:43Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-04T08:09:43Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Medical Ultrasound, 2019, v. 27 n. 3, p. 124-129-
dc.identifier.issn0929-6441-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278216-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: There were yet no correlation studies performed between ultrasound and the Chinese version of Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (C-BCTQ). Besides, controversies still remain regarding the correlation between ultrasound and different language versions of BCTQ. Purpose of the Study: To examine whether ultrasound can (i) reflect symptom severity and/or functional status, (ii) differentiate primary/secondary symptom, and (iii) correlate with subscale items in C-BCTQ. Methods: Forty-two Chinese female individuals (aged 58.84 ± 9.02 years) with 73 hands were enrolled in the study. Factor analysis was used to identify the hidden factors of C-BCTQ. Correlations were examined between hidden factors, relevant subscale items of C-BCTQ, and ultrasound. Results: Three factors were identified as Factor One (functional status, 36.534%), Two (sensory symptoms, 15.057%) and Three (pain, 11.867%), with 63.458% of total variance explained in C-BCTQ. All the ultrasound parameters were positively correlated with Factor One (r = 0.29-0.411, P < 0.05), while no correlations were found with Factor Two and Three. Meanwhile, correlation between wrist cross-sectional area and functional status scale (FSS) was also found (W-CSA, r = 0.266, P = 0.023), whereas no correlation was found with symptom severity scale (SSS), subscales of primary symptom (Paresthesia) and secondary symptom (pain) related items in C-BCTQ. Conclusion: Morphological information via ultrasound can reflect the impact on functionality that carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) exerted. However, it can be used neither to describe symptom severity nor differentiate primary/secondary symptom of CTS.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWolters Kluwer - Medknow Publications and Media Pvt. Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jmuonline.org-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Ultrasound-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectBoston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire-
dc.subjectcarpal tunnel syndrome-
dc.subjectfactor analysis-
dc.subjectnerve conduction studies-
dc.subjectultrasound-
dc.titleDiagnostic use of ultrasonography in carpal tunnel syndrome and its correlation with the Chinese version of boston carpal tunnel questionnaire-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KP: kpleungb@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHu, Y: yhud@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, WY: wyip@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHu, Y=rp00432-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, WY=rp00401-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.4103/JMU.JMU_94_18-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85072060901-
dc.identifier.hkuros306511-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage124-
dc.identifier.epage129-
dc.publisher.placeIndia-

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