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Conference Paper: Understanding stress among low-income parents in Hong Kong

TitleUnderstanding stress among low-income parents in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2019
Citation
WONCA Asia Pacific Regional Conference 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractAbstract Objective: Economic hardship and associated family tension may contribute to parental stress, predisposing individuals and families to mental health problems. This cross-sectional study aims to explore the association between personal and familial factors, stress and depressive symptoms among low-income parents in Hong Kong. Methods: 217 low-income parents were recruited from 2 less affluent districts in Hong Kong between March2016-October2017 to complete face-to-face survey. Parental stress was evaluated by the Depression-Anxiety-Stress-Scale(DASS)-21-Stress-subscale, where score≥8 indicates stressful experience. The Patient-Health-Questionnaire-9(PHQ-9) was used to assess presence/severity of depressive symptoms. Probable factors contributing to parents stress were collected: poverty, parental education level, marital status, intimate partner abuse assessed by the Abuse-Assessment-Screen-5(AAS-5), family harmony assessed by Family-Harmony-Scale-5(FHS-5), children factors including child’s cognitive ability, history of Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity-Disorder(ADHD) and behavioral problems using Strength-and-Difficulties-Questionnaire(SDQ). Independent t-test and chi-square were applied to examine differences between groups. Logistic regression was performed to examine factors associated with parental stress by adjusting all covariates. Results: Significantly more stressed parents(i.e DASS≥8,N=38) experienced depressive symptoms(PHQ-9-score≥10: 27.0%vs.4.8%, p<0.001) and suffered from mental illnesses(26.3%vs.5.6%,p<0.001). They were more likely to be single-parent (39.5%vs.19.0%,p=0.004), victim of intimate partner abuse (26.3%vs.8.4%,p=0.002), or have children with behavioral problems(mean SDQ-score(SD):15.47(6.54)vs.9.32(5.30),p<0.001). In addition, the families of the group were less harmonious (mean FHS-5-score(SD):17.22(4.91)vs.19.81(2.91),p<0.001) compared to families of non-stressed parents. After adjusting for covariates, family disharmony(Odds Ratio(OR)=0.811,p=0.006) and children behavioral problem(OR=1.141,p=0.001) significantly affected parental stress. Conclusion: Family harmony and behavioral problems of their children were highly correlated with parental stress and associated depression/mental illnesses. Whether the relationship is bi-directional needed to be further explored in longitudinal study.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277390

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, YTE-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, SNK-
dc.contributor.authorTang, HM-
dc.contributor.authorWong, RSM-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKH-
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLK-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-20T08:50:10Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-20T08:50:10Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationWONCA Asia Pacific Regional Conference 2019-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277390-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Objective: Economic hardship and associated family tension may contribute to parental stress, predisposing individuals and families to mental health problems. This cross-sectional study aims to explore the association between personal and familial factors, stress and depressive symptoms among low-income parents in Hong Kong. Methods: 217 low-income parents were recruited from 2 less affluent districts in Hong Kong between March2016-October2017 to complete face-to-face survey. Parental stress was evaluated by the Depression-Anxiety-Stress-Scale(DASS)-21-Stress-subscale, where score≥8 indicates stressful experience. The Patient-Health-Questionnaire-9(PHQ-9) was used to assess presence/severity of depressive symptoms. Probable factors contributing to parents stress were collected: poverty, parental education level, marital status, intimate partner abuse assessed by the Abuse-Assessment-Screen-5(AAS-5), family harmony assessed by Family-Harmony-Scale-5(FHS-5), children factors including child’s cognitive ability, history of Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity-Disorder(ADHD) and behavioral problems using Strength-and-Difficulties-Questionnaire(SDQ). Independent t-test and chi-square were applied to examine differences between groups. Logistic regression was performed to examine factors associated with parental stress by adjusting all covariates. Results: Significantly more stressed parents(i.e DASS≥8,N=38) experienced depressive symptoms(PHQ-9-score≥10: 27.0%vs.4.8%, p<0.001) and suffered from mental illnesses(26.3%vs.5.6%,p<0.001). They were more likely to be single-parent (39.5%vs.19.0%,p=0.004), victim of intimate partner abuse (26.3%vs.8.4%,p=0.002), or have children with behavioral problems(mean SDQ-score(SD):15.47(6.54)vs.9.32(5.30),p<0.001). In addition, the families of the group were less harmonious (mean FHS-5-score(SD):17.22(4.91)vs.19.81(2.91),p<0.001) compared to families of non-stressed parents. After adjusting for covariates, family disharmony(Odds Ratio(OR)=0.811,p=0.006) and children behavioral problem(OR=1.141,p=0.001) significantly affected parental stress. Conclusion: Family harmony and behavioral problems of their children were highly correlated with parental stress and associated depression/mental illnesses. Whether the relationship is bi-directional needed to be further explored in longitudinal study.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofWONCA Asia Pacific Regional Conference 2019-
dc.titleUnderstanding stress among low-income parents in Hong Kong-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailYu, YTE: ytyu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, SNK: kikisn@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTang, HM: erichm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, RSM: rosawong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CKH: carlosho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYu, YTE=rp01693-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CKH=rp01931-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350-
dc.identifier.hkuros305468-

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