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Article: Code-switching and multilingualism in literature

TitleCode-switching and multilingualism in literature
Authors
Keywordstranslingualism
Code-switching
conversational code-switching
multilingual literature
Issue Date2015
Citation
Language and Literature, 2015, v. 24, n. 3, p. 182-193 How to Cite?
Abstract© The Author(s) 2015. Code-switching in spoken modes has now been studied fairly extensively and is better understood at the conversational as well as the grammatical level. However, interest in written code-switching has developed more slowly and is still represented mainly in relation to specific periods, such as the Classical period and the medieval period, where a large number of works have now appeared. Linguists have questioned to what extent the models developed for spoken code-switching can be applied to writing, and a fortiori to literary writing. This introductory article reviews the main types of literary multilingualism and the main functions of code-switching within it. We conclude that there is at least a partial - and not inconsiderable - overlap between the functions of code-switching in spoken and written modalities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277025
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 0.525
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.264

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGardner-Chloros, Penelope-
dc.contributor.authorWeston, Daniel-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-18T08:35:22Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-18T08:35:22Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationLanguage and Literature, 2015, v. 24, n. 3, p. 182-193-
dc.identifier.issn0963-9470-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277025-
dc.description.abstract© The Author(s) 2015. Code-switching in spoken modes has now been studied fairly extensively and is better understood at the conversational as well as the grammatical level. However, interest in written code-switching has developed more slowly and is still represented mainly in relation to specific periods, such as the Classical period and the medieval period, where a large number of works have now appeared. Linguists have questioned to what extent the models developed for spoken code-switching can be applied to writing, and a fortiori to literary writing. This introductory article reviews the main types of literary multilingualism and the main functions of code-switching within it. We conclude that there is at least a partial - and not inconsiderable - overlap between the functions of code-switching in spoken and written modalities.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage and Literature-
dc.subjecttranslingualism-
dc.subjectCode-switching-
dc.subjectconversational code-switching-
dc.subjectmultilingual literature-
dc.titleCode-switching and multilingualism in literature-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0963947015585065-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84939810990-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage182-
dc.identifier.epage193-
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7293-

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