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Article: Mind the gap: What code-switching in literature can teach us about code-switching

TitleMind the gap: What code-switching in literature can teach us about code-switching
Authors
Keywordssociolinguistics
postcolonial literature
Borrowing
code-switching
multilingual literature
Issue Date2015
Citation
Language and Literature, 2015, v. 24, n. 3, p. 194-212 How to Cite?
Abstract© The Author(s) 2015. This article argues that contrary to sociolinguistic practice which emphasizes spontaneous speech as the main or only source of evidence, the study of literary code-switching (CS) can be relevant to an understanding of CS in general. CS is first distinguished from other forms of literary multilingualism and from borrowing. We then consider how CS fits in with the mimetic function in literary dialogue, and how its functions can be compared with those of natural speech. We will see that literary CS can provide a wealth of sociolinguistically relevant information on speech modes found in various communities, and is particularly apt to portray postcolonial tensions. More stylized CS in poetry and drama can also embody complex multicultural identities and patterns of language choice, even in the absence of strict verisimilitude.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/276497
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 0.525
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.264

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWeston, Daniel-
dc.contributor.authorGardner-Chloros, Penelope-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-18T08:33:47Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-18T08:33:47Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationLanguage and Literature, 2015, v. 24, n. 3, p. 194-212-
dc.identifier.issn0963-9470-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/276497-
dc.description.abstract© The Author(s) 2015. This article argues that contrary to sociolinguistic practice which emphasizes spontaneous speech as the main or only source of evidence, the study of literary code-switching (CS) can be relevant to an understanding of CS in general. CS is first distinguished from other forms of literary multilingualism and from borrowing. We then consider how CS fits in with the mimetic function in literary dialogue, and how its functions can be compared with those of natural speech. We will see that literary CS can provide a wealth of sociolinguistically relevant information on speech modes found in various communities, and is particularly apt to portray postcolonial tensions. More stylized CS in poetry and drama can also embody complex multicultural identities and patterns of language choice, even in the absence of strict verisimilitude.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage and Literature-
dc.subjectsociolinguistics-
dc.subjectpostcolonial literature-
dc.subjectBorrowing-
dc.subjectcode-switching-
dc.subjectmultilingual literature-
dc.titleMind the gap: What code-switching in literature can teach us about code-switching-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0963947015585066-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84939788084-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage194-
dc.identifier.epage212-
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7293-

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