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Article: Assessing sound symbolism: Investigating phonetic forms, visual shapes and letter fonts in an implicit bouba-kiki experimental paradigm

TitleAssessing sound symbolism: Investigating phonetic forms, visual shapes and letter fonts in an implicit bouba-kiki experimental paradigm
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS One, 2018, v. 13 n. 12, article no. e0208874 How to Cite?
AbstractClassically, in the bouba-kiki association task, a subject is asked to find the best association between one of two shapes–a round one and a spiky one–and one of two pseudowords–bouba and kiki. Numerous studies report that spiky shapes are associated with kiki, and round shapes with bouba. This task is likely the most prevalent in the study of non-conventional relationships between linguistic forms and meanings, also known as sound symbolism. However, associative tasks are explicit in the sense that they highlight phonetic and visual contrasts and require subjects to establish a crossmodal link between stimuli of different natures. Additionally, recent studies have raised the question whether visual resemblances between the target shapes and the letters explain the pattern of association, at least in literate subjects. In this paper, we report a more implicit testing paradigm of the bouba-kiki effect with the use of a lexical decision task with character strings presented in round or spiky frames. Pseudowords and words are, furthermore, displayed with either an angular or a curvy font to investigate possible graphemic bias. Innovative analyses of response times are performed with GAMLSS models, which offer a large range of possible distributions of error terms, and a generalized Gama distribution is found to be the most appropriate. No sound symbolic effect appears to be significant, but an interaction effect is in particular observed between spiky shapes and angular letters leading to faster response times. We discuss these results with respect to the visual saliency of angular shapes, priming, brain activation, synaesthesia and ideasthesia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275484
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.74
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDe Carolis, L-
dc.contributor.authorMarsico, E-
dc.contributor.authorArnaud, V-
dc.contributor.authorCoupe, C-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:43:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:43:28Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2018, v. 13 n. 12, article no. e0208874-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275484-
dc.description.abstractClassically, in the bouba-kiki association task, a subject is asked to find the best association between one of two shapes–a round one and a spiky one–and one of two pseudowords–bouba and kiki. Numerous studies report that spiky shapes are associated with kiki, and round shapes with bouba. This task is likely the most prevalent in the study of non-conventional relationships between linguistic forms and meanings, also known as sound symbolism. However, associative tasks are explicit in the sense that they highlight phonetic and visual contrasts and require subjects to establish a crossmodal link between stimuli of different natures. Additionally, recent studies have raised the question whether visual resemblances between the target shapes and the letters explain the pattern of association, at least in literate subjects. In this paper, we report a more implicit testing paradigm of the bouba-kiki effect with the use of a lexical decision task with character strings presented in round or spiky frames. Pseudowords and words are, furthermore, displayed with either an angular or a curvy font to investigate possible graphemic bias. Innovative analyses of response times are performed with GAMLSS models, which offer a large range of possible distributions of error terms, and a generalized Gama distribution is found to be the most appropriate. No sound symbolic effect appears to be significant, but an interaction effect is in particular observed between spiky shapes and angular letters leading to faster response times. We discuss these results with respect to the visual saliency of angular shapes, priming, brain activation, synaesthesia and ideasthesia.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleAssessing sound symbolism: Investigating phonetic forms, visual shapes and letter fonts in an implicit bouba-kiki experimental paradigm-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCoupe, C: ccoupe@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCoupe, C=rp02448-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0208874-
dc.identifier.pmid30576331-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6303039-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85058916983-
dc.identifier.hkuros303916-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e0208874-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e0208874-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000454149400021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl1932-6203-

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