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Article: A symbiotic balancing act: arbuscular mycorrhizal specificity and specialist fungus gnat pollination in the mycoheterotrophic genus Thismia (Thismiaceae)

TitleA symbiotic balancing act: arbuscular mycorrhizal specificity and specialist fungus gnat pollination in the mycoheterotrophic genus Thismia (Thismiaceae)
Authors
KeywordsCorynoptera fungus gnats
Rhizophagus
Thismia tentaculata
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
mycoheterotrophy
Issue Date2019
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Annals of Botany, 2019, v. 124 n. 2, p. 331-342 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mycorrhizal associations in mycoheterotrophic plants are generally more specialized than in autotrophs. Mycoheterotrophs typically bear small, inconspicuous flowers that often self-pollinate to maximize seed set, although some have structurally complex flowers indicative of xenogamy. A trade-off has previously been proposed between specialization in these above- and below-ground symbioses, although empirical data are lacking. METHODS: We used next-generation DNA sequencing to compare the mycorrhizal communities from the roots of a mycoheterotrophic species, Thismia tentaculata (Thismiaceae), and its neighbouring autotrophs. We furthermore conducted detailed assessments of floral phenology and pollination ecology, and performed artificial pollination experiments to determine the breeding system. KEY RESULTS: Thismia tentaculata maintains a symbiotic association with a single arbuscular mycorrhizal Rhizophagus species. The flowers are pollinated by a single species of fungus gnats (Corynoptera, Sciaridae), which are attracted by the yellow pigments and are temporarily restrained within the perianth chamber before departing via apertures between the anthers. The plants are self-compatible but predominantly xenogamous. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that T. tentaculata maintains highly specialized associations with pollinators and mycorrhizal fungi, both of which are widely distributed. We suggest that specialization in multiple symbiotic interactions is possible in mycoheterotrophs if redundant selective pressures are not exerted to further restrict an already constrained suite of life-history traits. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275428
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.646
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.912

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, X-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Z-
dc.contributor.authorMar, SS-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, D-
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, RMK-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:42:23Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:42:23Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of Botany, 2019, v. 124 n. 2, p. 331-342-
dc.identifier.issn0305-7364-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275428-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mycorrhizal associations in mycoheterotrophic plants are generally more specialized than in autotrophs. Mycoheterotrophs typically bear small, inconspicuous flowers that often self-pollinate to maximize seed set, although some have structurally complex flowers indicative of xenogamy. A trade-off has previously been proposed between specialization in these above- and below-ground symbioses, although empirical data are lacking. METHODS: We used next-generation DNA sequencing to compare the mycorrhizal communities from the roots of a mycoheterotrophic species, Thismia tentaculata (Thismiaceae), and its neighbouring autotrophs. We furthermore conducted detailed assessments of floral phenology and pollination ecology, and performed artificial pollination experiments to determine the breeding system. KEY RESULTS: Thismia tentaculata maintains a symbiotic association with a single arbuscular mycorrhizal Rhizophagus species. The flowers are pollinated by a single species of fungus gnats (Corynoptera, Sciaridae), which are attracted by the yellow pigments and are temporarily restrained within the perianth chamber before departing via apertures between the anthers. The plants are self-compatible but predominantly xenogamous. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that T. tentaculata maintains highly specialized associations with pollinators and mycorrhizal fungi, both of which are widely distributed. We suggest that specialization in multiple symbiotic interactions is possible in mycoheterotrophs if redundant selective pressures are not exerted to further restrict an already constrained suite of life-history traits. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Botany-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here].-
dc.subjectCorynoptera fungus gnats-
dc.subjectRhizophagus-
dc.subjectThismia tentaculata-
dc.subjectArbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-
dc.subjectmycoheterotrophy-
dc.titleA symbiotic balancing act: arbuscular mycorrhizal specificity and specialist fungus gnat pollination in the mycoheterotrophic genus Thismia (Thismiaceae)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGuo, X: guoxing2@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, RMK: saunders@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, RMK=rp00774-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aob/mcz087-
dc.identifier.pmid31189014-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85072629017-
dc.identifier.hkuros304658-
dc.identifier.volume124-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage331-
dc.identifier.epage342-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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