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Article: Clinical significance and biological role of cancer-derived Type I collagen in lung and esophageal cancers

TitleClinical significance and biological role of cancer-derived Type I collagen in lung and esophageal cancers
Authors
Keywordsesophagus cancer
extracellular matrix
non-small cell lung cancer
tumor microenvironment
Type I collagen
Issue Date2019
PublisherWiley Open Access: Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1759-7714
Citation
Thoracic Cancer, 2019, v. 10 n. 2, p. 277-288 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Extracellular matrix (ECM) is remodeled during carcinogenesis. An abundant constituent of ECM is collagen. Type I collagen is secreted by fibroblasts, is important for tumor growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and may also be secreted by cancer cells. However, the role and function of cancer-derived Type I collagen in the tumor microenvironment remains unclear. Methods: We used immunohistochemistry and Western blot to detect Type I collagen expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines, respectively. We assessed the migration and adhesion capability of these cells in vivo by inhibiting Type I collagen in tumors. Relevant data were extracted from a large cohort study of The Cancer Genome Atlas to analyze messenger RNA levels. Protein expression of Type I collagen was further determined in tumor tissues of patients using tissue microarray. Results: Cancer cell lines secreted Type I collagen. The molecular weight of cancer-derived Type I collagen was different from that secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts and normal fibroblasts. Expression levels of COL1A1 and COL1A2 (subtypes of Type I collagen) messenger RNA in NSCLC and ESCC tumors were higher than in normal tissues, but were not associated with tumor node metastasis stages. Low expression of Type I collagen was significantly associated with poor overall survival and cancer cell differentiation. Conclusion: NSCLC and ESCC cells could produce Type I collagen endogenously, revealing the potential functions of Type I collagen in cancer development. Cancer-derived Type I collagen was associated with overall survival and cancer cell differentiation. © 2019 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274904
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.569
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.239
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFang, S-
dc.contributor.authorDai, Y-
dc.contributor.authorMei, Y-
dc.contributor.authorYang, M-
dc.contributor.authorHu, L-
dc.contributor.authorYang, H-
dc.contributor.authorGuan, X-
dc.contributor.authorLi, J-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:31:17Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:31:17Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationThoracic Cancer, 2019, v. 10 n. 2, p. 277-288-
dc.identifier.issn1759-7706-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274904-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Extracellular matrix (ECM) is remodeled during carcinogenesis. An abundant constituent of ECM is collagen. Type I collagen is secreted by fibroblasts, is important for tumor growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and may also be secreted by cancer cells. However, the role and function of cancer-derived Type I collagen in the tumor microenvironment remains unclear. Methods: We used immunohistochemistry and Western blot to detect Type I collagen expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines, respectively. We assessed the migration and adhesion capability of these cells in vivo by inhibiting Type I collagen in tumors. Relevant data were extracted from a large cohort study of The Cancer Genome Atlas to analyze messenger RNA levels. Protein expression of Type I collagen was further determined in tumor tissues of patients using tissue microarray. Results: Cancer cell lines secreted Type I collagen. The molecular weight of cancer-derived Type I collagen was different from that secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts and normal fibroblasts. Expression levels of COL1A1 and COL1A2 (subtypes of Type I collagen) messenger RNA in NSCLC and ESCC tumors were higher than in normal tissues, but were not associated with tumor node metastasis stages. Low expression of Type I collagen was significantly associated with poor overall survival and cancer cell differentiation. Conclusion: NSCLC and ESCC cells could produce Type I collagen endogenously, revealing the potential functions of Type I collagen in cancer development. Cancer-derived Type I collagen was associated with overall survival and cancer cell differentiation. © 2019 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley Open Access: Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1759-7714-
dc.relation.ispartofThoracic Cancer-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectesophagus cancer-
dc.subjectextracellular matrix-
dc.subjectnon-small cell lung cancer-
dc.subjecttumor microenvironment-
dc.subjectType I collagen-
dc.titleClinical significance and biological role of cancer-derived Type I collagen in lung and esophageal cancers-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGuan, X: xyguan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, X=rp00454-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1759-7714.12947-
dc.identifier.pmid30604926-
dc.identifier.scopuseid-2-s2.0-85059518314-
dc.identifier.hkuros302606-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage277-
dc.identifier.epage288-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000457791200021-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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