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Article: Family socioeconomic position and abnormal birth weight: evidence from a Chinese birth cohort

TitleFamily socioeconomic position and abnormal birth weight: evidence from a Chinese birth cohort
Authors
KeywordsBirth cohort
Low birth weight
Macrosomia
Socioeconomic position
Issue Date2019
PublisherZhejiang University, School of Medicine Children's Hospital, co-published with Springer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wjpch.com
Citation
World Journal of Pediatrics, 2019, Epub How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Birth weight is a strong determinant of infant short- and long-term health outcomes. Family socioeconomic position (SEP) is usually positively associated with birth weight. Whether this association extends to abnormal birth weight or there exists potential mediator is unclear. Methods: We analyzed data from 14,984 mother-infant dyads from the Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the associations of a composite family SEP score quartile with macrosomia and low birth weight (LBW), and examined the potential mediation effect of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) using causal mediation analysis. Results: The prevalence of macrosomia and LBW was 2.62% (n = 392) and 4.26% (n = 638). Higher family SEP was associated with a higher risk of macrosomia (OR 1.30, 95% CI 0.93–1.82; OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.11–2.11; and OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.15–2.20 for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th SEP quartile respectively) and a lower risk of LBW (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55–0.86; OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61–0.94; and OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.48–0.77 for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th SEP quartile respectively), compared to the 1st SEP quartile. We found that pre-pregnancy BMI did not mediate the associations of SEP with macrosomia and LBW. Conclusions: Socioeconomic disparities in fetal macrosomia and LBW exist in Southern China. Whether the results can be applied to other populations should be further investigated. © 2019, Children's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274517
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.228
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.493

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTu, S-
dc.contributor.authorWang, AL-
dc.contributor.authorTan, MZ-
dc.contributor.authorLu, JH-
dc.contributor.authorHe, JR-
dc.contributor.authorShen, SY-
dc.contributor.authorWei, DM-
dc.contributor.authorLu, MS-
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, SL-
dc.contributor.authorXia, HM-
dc.contributor.authorQiu, X-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T15:03:15Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T15:03:15Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationWorld Journal of Pediatrics, 2019, Epub-
dc.identifier.issn1708-8569-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274517-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Birth weight is a strong determinant of infant short- and long-term health outcomes. Family socioeconomic position (SEP) is usually positively associated with birth weight. Whether this association extends to abnormal birth weight or there exists potential mediator is unclear. Methods: We analyzed data from 14,984 mother-infant dyads from the Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the associations of a composite family SEP score quartile with macrosomia and low birth weight (LBW), and examined the potential mediation effect of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) using causal mediation analysis. Results: The prevalence of macrosomia and LBW was 2.62% (n = 392) and 4.26% (n = 638). Higher family SEP was associated with a higher risk of macrosomia (OR 1.30, 95% CI 0.93–1.82; OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.11–2.11; and OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.15–2.20 for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th SEP quartile respectively) and a lower risk of LBW (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55–0.86; OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61–0.94; and OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.48–0.77 for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th SEP quartile respectively), compared to the 1st SEP quartile. We found that pre-pregnancy BMI did not mediate the associations of SEP with macrosomia and LBW. Conclusions: Socioeconomic disparities in fetal macrosomia and LBW exist in Southern China. Whether the results can be applied to other populations should be further investigated. © 2019, Children's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherZhejiang University, School of Medicine Children's Hospital, co-published with Springer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wjpch.com-
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Pediatrics-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectBirth cohort-
dc.subjectLow birth weight-
dc.subjectMacrosomia-
dc.subjectSocioeconomic position-
dc.titleFamily socioeconomic position and abnormal birth weight: evidence from a Chinese birth cohort-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailAu Yeung, SL: ayslryan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityAu Yeung, SL=rp02224-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12519-019-00279-7-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85068832901-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85068832901-
dc.identifier.hkuros301296-
dc.publisher.placeChina-

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