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Article: Neural correlates and functional connectivity of lexical tone processing in reading

TitleNeural correlates and functional connectivity of lexical tone processing in reading
Authors
KeywordsLanguage
Lexical tone
Reading
Chinese reading
Suprasegmental phonology
Issue Date2019
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l
Citation
Brain and Language, 2019, v. 196, p. article no. 104662 How to Cite?
AbstractLexical tone processing in speech is mediated by bilateral superior temporal and inferior prefrontal regions, but little is known concerning the neural circuitries of lexical tone phonology in reading. Using fMRI, we examined the neural systems for lexical tone in visual Chinese word recognition. We found that the extraction of lexical tone phonology in print was subserved by bilateral fronto-parietal regions. Seed-to-voxel analyses showed that functionally connected cortical regions involved right inferior frontal gyrus and SMA, right middle frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule, and SMA and bilateral cingulate gyri. Our results indicate that in Chinese tone reading, a bilateral network of frontal, parietal, motor, and cingulate regions is engaged, without involvement of temporal regions crucial for tone identification in auditory domain. Although neural couplings for lexical tone processing are different in speech and reading to some degree, the motor cortex seems to be a key component independent of modality.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274488
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.851
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKWOK, VPY-
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, S-
dc.contributor.authorYakpo, K-
dc.contributor.authorTan, LH-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T15:02:42Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T15:02:42Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBrain and Language, 2019, v. 196, p. article no. 104662-
dc.identifier.issn0093-934X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274488-
dc.description.abstractLexical tone processing in speech is mediated by bilateral superior temporal and inferior prefrontal regions, but little is known concerning the neural circuitries of lexical tone phonology in reading. Using fMRI, we examined the neural systems for lexical tone in visual Chinese word recognition. We found that the extraction of lexical tone phonology in print was subserved by bilateral fronto-parietal regions. Seed-to-voxel analyses showed that functionally connected cortical regions involved right inferior frontal gyrus and SMA, right middle frontal gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule, and SMA and bilateral cingulate gyri. Our results indicate that in Chinese tone reading, a bilateral network of frontal, parietal, motor, and cingulate regions is engaged, without involvement of temporal regions crucial for tone identification in auditory domain. Although neural couplings for lexical tone processing are different in speech and reading to some degree, the motor cortex seems to be a key component independent of modality.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l-
dc.relation.ispartofBrain and Language-
dc.subjectLanguage-
dc.subjectLexical tone-
dc.subjectReading-
dc.subjectChinese reading-
dc.subjectSuprasegmental phonology-
dc.titleNeural correlates and functional connectivity of lexical tone processing in reading-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMatthews, S: matthews@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYakpo, K: kofi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMatthews, S=rp01207-
dc.identifier.authorityYakpo, K=rp01715-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104662-
dc.identifier.pmid31352216-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85069649683-
dc.identifier.hkuros301460-
dc.identifier.volume196-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 104662-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 104662-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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