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Article: Treatment of Chinese adolescents with anorexia nervosa in Hong Kong: The gap between treatment expectations and outcomes

TitleTreatment of Chinese adolescents with anorexia nervosa in Hong Kong: The gap between treatment expectations and outcomes
Authors
Keywordsadolescent
adult
anorexia nervosa
body weight management
child parent relation
Issue Date2019
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS One, 2019, v. 14 n. 5, p. article no. e0216582 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and objective: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is one of the most difficult-to-treat psychiatric disorders. AN is associated with individual vulnerability, societal and family factors. There has been limited research in Asia regarding the patients or their families’ perceptions on its treatment. This study explored the perceived treatment outcomes among Chinese families having adolescents with AN. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted on parents of adolescents with AN recruited through an eating disorder association in Hong Kong to understand their views and experiences regarding the help-seeking and treatment process. Results: The parents expressed dissatisfaction towards help-seeking and treatment outcomes, including relationships with health professionals, hospitalization, health professionals’ knowledge of AN, understanding of the treatment model and parents’ role, amount of psychological support, and coordination among health professionals. The parents were unclear about the treatment plan as they received little explanation from the health professionals. The parents perceived that the AN treatment only focused on weight restoration with limited psychological support. Home diet monitoring was seen as a harsh task which worsened the relationship with their children. The parents often needed to take up the coordinator role and search around for different health professionals and integrate their advices by themselves. Conclusions: The study shows that limited psychoeducation, communication and coordination in the treatment for AN are major problems in a Chinese context. Open communication between the health professionals and the parents about the expected treatment outcomes and limitations is needed to enhance their mutual trust. Besides, treatment should emphasize not only family involvement but also empower them to fight against AN.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274416
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.766
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, KS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TP-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, KW-
dc.contributor.authorChong, KY-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, MK-
dc.contributor.authorWu, D-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T15:01:17Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T15:01:17Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2019, v. 14 n. 5, p. article no. e0216582-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274416-
dc.description.abstractBackground and objective: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is one of the most difficult-to-treat psychiatric disorders. AN is associated with individual vulnerability, societal and family factors. There has been limited research in Asia regarding the patients or their families’ perceptions on its treatment. This study explored the perceived treatment outcomes among Chinese families having adolescents with AN. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted on parents of adolescents with AN recruited through an eating disorder association in Hong Kong to understand their views and experiences regarding the help-seeking and treatment process. Results: The parents expressed dissatisfaction towards help-seeking and treatment outcomes, including relationships with health professionals, hospitalization, health professionals’ knowledge of AN, understanding of the treatment model and parents’ role, amount of psychological support, and coordination among health professionals. The parents were unclear about the treatment plan as they received little explanation from the health professionals. The parents perceived that the AN treatment only focused on weight restoration with limited psychological support. Home diet monitoring was seen as a harsh task which worsened the relationship with their children. The parents often needed to take up the coordinator role and search around for different health professionals and integrate their advices by themselves. Conclusions: The study shows that limited psychoeducation, communication and coordination in the treatment for AN are major problems in a Chinese context. Open communication between the health professionals and the parents about the expected treatment outcomes and limitations is needed to enhance their mutual trust. Besides, treatment should emphasize not only family involvement but also empower them to fight against AN.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS One-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectadolescent-
dc.subjectadult-
dc.subjectanorexia nervosa-
dc.subjectbody weight management-
dc.subjectchild parent relation-
dc.titleTreatment of Chinese adolescents with anorexia nervosa in Hong Kong: The gap between treatment expectations and outcomes-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSun, KS: kssun2@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TP: tplam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKwok, KW: katiekw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChong, KY: drkyc@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPoon, MK: poondr@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TP=rp00386-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0216582-
dc.identifier.pmid31071136-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6508709-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85065675402-
dc.identifier.hkuros301648-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e0216582-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e0216582-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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