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Article: Laparoscopic versus open repair for small paraumbilical hernia: a retrospective review

TitleLaparoscopic versus open repair for small paraumbilical hernia: a retrospective review
Authors
KeywordsLaparoscopic repair
open repair
paraumbilical hernia
Issue Date2019
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1758-5910
Citation
Asian Journal of Endoscopic Surgery, 2019, v. 12 n. 3, p. 306-310 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: The advantages of laparoscopic surgery for ventral hernia repairs are well documented, but its application for small paraumbilical hernias has been less studied. There is no consensus regarding the best technique. Methods: All patients who had open (suture or mesh) and laparoscopic repair of primary paraumbilical hernia between September 2007 and September 2017 in a single center were identified. Hernial defects of 2 cm or less were included; recurrent hernias were excluded. Primary outcomes included operative time, length of hospital stay, and surgical complications. Results: Seventy‐seven patients were recruited: 54 (70.1%) had open repair and 23 (29.9%) had laparoscopic repair. Forty‐six patients (85%) in the open group had primary suture repair. The mean operative time was significantly shorter in the open group than in the laparoscopic group (27.2 vs 56.1 min, P < 0.05). The length of hospital stay in the open group was significantly shorter than in the laparoscopic group (0.8 vs 1.4 days, P = 0.00). Early complications rates were similar, with wound complications in 5.6% (3/54) of open repair patients and 4.3% (1/23) of laparoscopic repair patients (P = 1.0). Among open repair patients, 19 patients (35.2%) were successfully discharged within 12 h after operation. Two patients (3.7%) in the open simple suture group developed recurrence, but no recurrence was identified in the laparoscopic group; this was not statistically significant (P = 1.0). Conclusion: The laparoscopic approach is comparable to the open approach in the repair of small paraumbilical hernias. For small paraumbilical hernias, we recommend that laparoscopic repair be reserved for obese patients or those with suspected multiple hernial defects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274058
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.394

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, I-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BHH-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, TT-
dc.contributor.authorNg, KK-
dc.contributor.authorNg, L-
dc.contributor.authorWong, KY-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T14:54:13Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T14:54:13Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationAsian Journal of Endoscopic Surgery, 2019, v. 12 n. 3, p. 306-310-
dc.identifier.issn1758-5910-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274058-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The advantages of laparoscopic surgery for ventral hernia repairs are well documented, but its application for small paraumbilical hernias has been less studied. There is no consensus regarding the best technique. Methods: All patients who had open (suture or mesh) and laparoscopic repair of primary paraumbilical hernia between September 2007 and September 2017 in a single center were identified. Hernial defects of 2 cm or less were included; recurrent hernias were excluded. Primary outcomes included operative time, length of hospital stay, and surgical complications. Results: Seventy‐seven patients were recruited: 54 (70.1%) had open repair and 23 (29.9%) had laparoscopic repair. Forty‐six patients (85%) in the open group had primary suture repair. The mean operative time was significantly shorter in the open group than in the laparoscopic group (27.2 vs 56.1 min, P < 0.05). The length of hospital stay in the open group was significantly shorter than in the laparoscopic group (0.8 vs 1.4 days, P = 0.00). Early complications rates were similar, with wound complications in 5.6% (3/54) of open repair patients and 4.3% (1/23) of laparoscopic repair patients (P = 1.0). Among open repair patients, 19 patients (35.2%) were successfully discharged within 12 h after operation. Two patients (3.7%) in the open simple suture group developed recurrence, but no recurrence was identified in the laparoscopic group; this was not statistically significant (P = 1.0). Conclusion: The laparoscopic approach is comparable to the open approach in the repair of small paraumbilical hernias. For small paraumbilical hernias, we recommend that laparoscopic repair be reserved for obese patients or those with suspected multiple hernial defects.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1758-5910-
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Journal of Endoscopic Surgery-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectLaparoscopic repair-
dc.subjectopen repair-
dc.subjectparaumbilical hernia-
dc.titleLaparoscopic versus open repair for small paraumbilical hernia: a retrospective review-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, KK: ngkakin@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ases.12644-
dc.identifier.pmid30168291-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85069267505-
dc.identifier.hkuros301317-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage306-
dc.identifier.epage310-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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