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Article: Insomnia identity and its correlates in adolescents

TitleInsomnia identity and its correlates in adolescents
Authors
KeywordsIllness perception
Insomnia
Poor sleep
Secondary school
Sleep disturbance
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/internal/journal/11325
Citation
Sleep and Breathing, 2019, Epub How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Insomnia identity, defined as a conviction that one has insomnia, is a cognitive appraisal process that influences help-seeking, diagnosis, and treatment of insomnia. Previous studies in adults showed that about 50% of poor sleepers did not label themselves as having insomnia, while 10% of good sleepers endorsed insomnia identity. This analysis aimed to examine the proportions and characteristics of complaining and noncomplaining poor and good sleepers and the factors that determine self-labeling of insomnia in adolescents. Methods: Data from a school-based study were analyzed. We defined insomnia identity as an endorsement of “insomnia” occurring 3–7 nights per week, while 3 criteria of poor sleep were examined. A total of 1447 students were included, the mean age was 14.5 years and 55.5% were females. Results: Using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria to define poor sleep (insomnia symptoms ≥ 3 times per week), the proportions of complaining and noncomplaining poor sleepers were 2.3% and 8.8%, while complaining and noncomplaining good sleepers were 0.8% and 88.2%, respectively. The ratio between complaining and noncomplaining poor sleepers was 1 to 3.8. Complaining poor sleepers had the highest level of insomnia and daytime symptoms, while complaining good sleepers had the highest proportion of smokers and drinkers. Multivariate logistic regression showed that insomnia symptoms and sleep dissatisfaction were independent predictors of insomnia identity. Conclusions: In view of the high proportion of noncomplaining poor sleepers, educational programs should address the under-appraisal of insomnia among adolescents. © 2019, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274018
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.03
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.832

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, KF-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WF-
dc.contributor.authorHo, FYY-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T14:53:23Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T14:53:23Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationSleep and Breathing, 2019, Epub-
dc.identifier.issn1520-9512-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274018-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Insomnia identity, defined as a conviction that one has insomnia, is a cognitive appraisal process that influences help-seeking, diagnosis, and treatment of insomnia. Previous studies in adults showed that about 50% of poor sleepers did not label themselves as having insomnia, while 10% of good sleepers endorsed insomnia identity. This analysis aimed to examine the proportions and characteristics of complaining and noncomplaining poor and good sleepers and the factors that determine self-labeling of insomnia in adolescents. Methods: Data from a school-based study were analyzed. We defined insomnia identity as an endorsement of “insomnia” occurring 3–7 nights per week, while 3 criteria of poor sleep were examined. A total of 1447 students were included, the mean age was 14.5 years and 55.5% were females. Results: Using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria to define poor sleep (insomnia symptoms ≥ 3 times per week), the proportions of complaining and noncomplaining poor sleepers were 2.3% and 8.8%, while complaining and noncomplaining good sleepers were 0.8% and 88.2%, respectively. The ratio between complaining and noncomplaining poor sleepers was 1 to 3.8. Complaining poor sleepers had the highest level of insomnia and daytime symptoms, while complaining good sleepers had the highest proportion of smokers and drinkers. Multivariate logistic regression showed that insomnia symptoms and sleep dissatisfaction were independent predictors of insomnia identity. Conclusions: In view of the high proportion of noncomplaining poor sleepers, educational programs should address the under-appraisal of insomnia among adolescents. © 2019, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/internal/journal/11325-
dc.relation.ispartofSleep and Breathing-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectIllness perception-
dc.subjectInsomnia-
dc.subjectPoor sleep-
dc.subjectSecondary school-
dc.subjectSleep disturbance-
dc.titleInsomnia identity and its correlates in adolescents-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11325-019-01913-4-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85070310177-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85070310177-
dc.identifier.hkuros301778-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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