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Article: Dietary Habits, Fatty Acids and Carotenoid Levels Are Associated with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Chinese

TitleDietary Habits, Fatty Acids and Carotenoid Levels Are Associated with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Chinese
Authors
Keywordsmacular degeneration
polyunsaturated fatty acid
saturated fatty acid
carotenoids
Issue Date2019
PublisherMDPI AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/nutrients/
Citation
Nutrients, 2019, v. 11 n. 8, p. article no. 1720 How to Cite?
AbstractThe role of diet and circulatory carotenoids and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but not well studied in Chinese. However, other fatty acids were not comprehensively evaluated if it had additional consequence on AMD. This study investigated the relationship among dietary habits, fatty acids levels, carotenoids and AMD in Hong Kong Chinese adults. In this cross-sectional case-controlled study, plasma fatty acids including, saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and carotenoids levels were quantified between patients with neovascular AMD (n = 99) and age-gender-matched controls (n = 198). A food frequency questionnaire was also conducted. Low blood carotenoid levels and omega-3 PUFAs namely DHA, EPA and α-linolenic acid increased the odds ratio of developing neovascular AMD. High blood omega-6 PUFAs specifically arachidonic acid and eicosadienoic acid, oleic acid (a MUFA) and SFA levels increased the odds ratio of having neovascular AMD. Neovascular AMD group had significantly less omega-3 PUFA rich food (vegetables, nuts, seafood) intake and higher SFA (meat) intake than controls. In short, neovascular AMD was associated with lower circulatory levels of carotenoids and omega-3 PUFAs, and higher level of omega-6 PUFAs, oleic acid and SFAs in the Hong Kong Chinese population. These findings enhance the understandings of dietary impacts on neovascular AMD and provide a context for future nutritional intervention studies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272724
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.196
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.275

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, ALK-
dc.contributor.authorLEUNG, HH-
dc.contributor.authorKawasaki, R-
dc.contributor.authorHo, WL-
dc.contributor.authorChow, LLW-
dc.contributor.authorChow, SSW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, JCY-
dc.contributor.authorWong, IYH-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:15:22Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:15:22Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationNutrients, 2019, v. 11 n. 8, p. article no. 1720-
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272724-
dc.description.abstractThe role of diet and circulatory carotenoids and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are implicated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) but not well studied in Chinese. However, other fatty acids were not comprehensively evaluated if it had additional consequence on AMD. This study investigated the relationship among dietary habits, fatty acids levels, carotenoids and AMD in Hong Kong Chinese adults. In this cross-sectional case-controlled study, plasma fatty acids including, saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and carotenoids levels were quantified between patients with neovascular AMD (n = 99) and age-gender-matched controls (n = 198). A food frequency questionnaire was also conducted. Low blood carotenoid levels and omega-3 PUFAs namely DHA, EPA and α-linolenic acid increased the odds ratio of developing neovascular AMD. High blood omega-6 PUFAs specifically arachidonic acid and eicosadienoic acid, oleic acid (a MUFA) and SFA levels increased the odds ratio of having neovascular AMD. Neovascular AMD group had significantly less omega-3 PUFA rich food (vegetables, nuts, seafood) intake and higher SFA (meat) intake than controls. In short, neovascular AMD was associated with lower circulatory levels of carotenoids and omega-3 PUFAs, and higher level of omega-6 PUFAs, oleic acid and SFAs in the Hong Kong Chinese population. These findings enhance the understandings of dietary impacts on neovascular AMD and provide a context for future nutritional intervention studies.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMDPI AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/nutrients/-
dc.relation.ispartofNutrients-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectmacular degeneration-
dc.subjectpolyunsaturated fatty acid-
dc.subjectsaturated fatty acid-
dc.subjectcarotenoids-
dc.titleDietary Habits, Fatty Acids and Carotenoid Levels Are Associated with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Chinese-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, ALK: nlk008@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, JCY: jettylee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, IYH: wongyhi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, ALK=rp01842-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, JCY=rp01511-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, IYH=rp01467-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu11081720-
dc.identifier.pmid31349710-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85070260307-
dc.identifier.hkuros300693-
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 1720-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 1720-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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