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Article: 'Our Impending Doom': Seriality's End in Late-Victorian Proto-Dystopian Novels

Title'Our Impending Doom': Seriality's End in Late-Victorian Proto-Dystopian Novels
Authors
KeywordsUtopian fiction
Novels
Utopias
Written narratives
Dystopian fiction
Issue Date2018
PublisherPennsylvania State University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_jmps.html
Citation
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, 2018, v. 9 n. 1, p. 1-29 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines utopian/dystopian time and serial form in several late nineteenth-century proto-dystopian novels, including Anthony Trollope’s The Fixed Period, James De Mille’s A Strange Manuscript in a Copper Cylinder, and H. G. Wells’s The Time Machine. Through mingling the futuristic orientation of utopias and the presentist cause-and-effect experience of serial form, late nineteenth-century dystopias do not set these other worlds in the distant future; rather, they ask readers to see signs of their mortality in the everyday. In doing so, these paradoxical temporalities combine to highlight the finiteness of late-Victorian institutions in the face of more expansive depictions experience.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272674
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.125

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorValdez, JR-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:14:24Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:14:24Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Modern Periodical Studies, 2018, v. 9 n. 1, p. 1-29-
dc.identifier.issn1947-6574-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272674-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines utopian/dystopian time and serial form in several late nineteenth-century proto-dystopian novels, including Anthony Trollope’s The Fixed Period, James De Mille’s A Strange Manuscript in a Copper Cylinder, and H. G. Wells’s The Time Machine. Through mingling the futuristic orientation of utopias and the presentist cause-and-effect experience of serial form, late nineteenth-century dystopias do not set these other worlds in the distant future; rather, they ask readers to see signs of their mortality in the everyday. In doing so, these paradoxical temporalities combine to highlight the finiteness of late-Victorian institutions in the face of more expansive depictions experience.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPennsylvania State University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_jmps.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Modern Periodical Studies-
dc.rightsJournal of Modern Periodical Studies. Copyright © Pennsylvania State University Press.-
dc.subjectUtopian fiction-
dc.subjectNovels-
dc.subjectUtopias-
dc.subjectWritten narratives-
dc.subjectDystopian fiction-
dc.title'Our Impending Doom': Seriality's End in Late-Victorian Proto-Dystopian Novels-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailValdez, JR: jvaldez@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityValdez, JR=rp01975-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.5325/jmodeperistud.9.1.0001-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85070074407-
dc.identifier.hkuros300542-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage29-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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