File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Fear of cancer recurrence among Chinese cancer survivors: Prevalence and associations with metacognition and neuroticism

TitleFear of cancer recurrence among Chinese cancer survivors: Prevalence and associations with metacognition and neuroticism
Authors
KeywordsBreast cancer
Cancer
Colorectal cancer
Fear of cancer recurrence
Metacognition
Neuroticism
Oncology
Issue Date2019
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2019, v. 28 n. 6, p. 1243-1251 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) represents a chronic burden for many cancer survivors. We determined FCR prevalence and potential correlates, specifically metacognitive styles and neuroticism among Chinese cancer survivors with breast or colorectal cancer. Methods: This study included 285 Chinese patients with breast (N = 173) and colorectal (N = 112) cancers at 8‐week postsurgery. Participants completed a set of baseline questionnaires evaluating FCR (Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory‐Short Form [FCRI‐SF]), metacognition (Metacognitions Questionnaire‐30), and neuroticism (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire). Scores of 13 to 21 were indicative of subclinical FCR on the FCRI‐SF. Scores greater than or equal to 22 indicated clinically significant levels of FCR. Fully adjusted multinomial logistic regressions identified correlates of subclinical and clinically significant FCR. Results: Respectively, 26.0% (n = 74) and 11.2% (n = 32) achieved scores indicating subclinical and clinically significant FCR. Expressing significantly more positive (OR = 1.21, P = .003) and negative (OR = 1.19, P = .005) beliefs about worry was associated with a higher likelihood of reporting subclinical FCR. Both higher neuroticism (OR = 1.28, P = .003) and more negative beliefs about worry (OR = 1.19, P = 0.035) were associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing clinically significant FCR. Conclusions: Positive and negative metacognitions may play an important role in the development of subclinical FCR. In particular, negative metacognition and neuroticism may elevate FCR from subclinical to a clinical level. The findings give insight into the identification of cancer survivors with subclinical or clinical FCR and aid the development of interventions aimed at changing metacognitive beliefs in order to manage FCR.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272079
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.006
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, DWL-
dc.contributor.authorKwong, A-
dc.contributor.authorSuen, D-
dc.contributor.authorChan, M-
dc.contributor.authorOr, A-
dc.contributor.authorNg, SS-
dc.contributor.authorFoo, CC-
dc.contributor.authorFielding, BFS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWT-
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-20T10:35:15Z-
dc.date.available2019-07-20T10:35:15Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2019, v. 28 n. 6, p. 1243-1251-
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272079-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) represents a chronic burden for many cancer survivors. We determined FCR prevalence and potential correlates, specifically metacognitive styles and neuroticism among Chinese cancer survivors with breast or colorectal cancer. Methods: This study included 285 Chinese patients with breast (N = 173) and colorectal (N = 112) cancers at 8‐week postsurgery. Participants completed a set of baseline questionnaires evaluating FCR (Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory‐Short Form [FCRI‐SF]), metacognition (Metacognitions Questionnaire‐30), and neuroticism (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire). Scores of 13 to 21 were indicative of subclinical FCR on the FCRI‐SF. Scores greater than or equal to 22 indicated clinically significant levels of FCR. Fully adjusted multinomial logistic regressions identified correlates of subclinical and clinically significant FCR. Results: Respectively, 26.0% (n = 74) and 11.2% (n = 32) achieved scores indicating subclinical and clinically significant FCR. Expressing significantly more positive (OR = 1.21, P = .003) and negative (OR = 1.19, P = .005) beliefs about worry was associated with a higher likelihood of reporting subclinical FCR. Both higher neuroticism (OR = 1.28, P = .003) and more negative beliefs about worry (OR = 1.19, P = 0.035) were associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing clinically significant FCR. Conclusions: Positive and negative metacognitions may play an important role in the development of subclinical FCR. In particular, negative metacognition and neuroticism may elevate FCR from subclinical to a clinical level. The findings give insight into the identification of cancer survivors with subclinical or clinical FCR and aid the development of interventions aimed at changing metacognitive beliefs in order to manage FCR.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncology-
dc.subjectBreast cancer-
dc.subjectCancer-
dc.subjectColorectal cancer-
dc.subjectFear of cancer recurrence-
dc.subjectMetacognition-
dc.subjectNeuroticism-
dc.subjectOncology-
dc.titleFear of cancer recurrence among Chinese cancer survivors: Prevalence and associations with metacognition and neuroticism-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKwong, A: avakwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSuen, D: suentkd@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFoo, CC: ccfoo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, A=rp01734-
dc.identifier.authorityFoo, CC=rp01899-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.5073-
dc.identifier.pmid30932279-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85064901360-
dc.identifier.hkuros298416-
dc.identifier.volume28-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1243-
dc.identifier.epage1251-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000470763500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats