File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Novel anammox bacteria and nitrogen loss from Lake Superior

TitleNovel anammox bacteria and nitrogen loss from Lake Superior
Authors
Issue Date2017
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2017, v. 7, n. 1, article no. 13757, p. 1-7 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2017 The Author(s). Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria own a central position in the global N-cycle, as they have the ability to oxidize NH4+ to N2 under anoxic conditions using NO2-. They are responsible for up to 50% of all N2 released from marine ecosystems into the atmosphere and are thus indispensible for balancing the activity of N-fixing bacteria and completing the marine N-cycle. The contribution, diversity, and impact of anammox bacteria in freshwater ecosystems, however, is largely unknown, confounding assessments of their role in the global N-cycle. Here we report the activity and diversity of anammox bacteria in the world's largest freshwater lake - Lake Superior. We found that anammox performed by previously undiscovered bacteria is an important contributor to sediment N2 production. We observed striking differences in the anammox bacterial populations found at different locations within Lake Superior and those described from other locations. Our data thus reveal that novel anammox bacteria underpin N-loss from Lake Superior, and if more broadly distributed across inland waters would play an important role in continental N-cycling and mitigation of fixed nitrogen transfer from land to the sea.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269769
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.122
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCrowe, Sean A.-
dc.contributor.authorTreusch, Alexander H.-
dc.contributor.authorForth, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jiying-
dc.contributor.authorMagen, Cedric-
dc.contributor.authorCanfield, Donald E.-
dc.contributor.authorThamdrup, Bo-
dc.contributor.authorKatsev, Sergei-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-30T01:49:32Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-30T01:49:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2017, v. 7, n. 1, article no. 13757, p. 1-7-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269769-
dc.description.abstract© 2017 The Author(s). Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria own a central position in the global N-cycle, as they have the ability to oxidize NH4+ to N2 under anoxic conditions using NO2-. They are responsible for up to 50% of all N2 released from marine ecosystems into the atmosphere and are thus indispensible for balancing the activity of N-fixing bacteria and completing the marine N-cycle. The contribution, diversity, and impact of anammox bacteria in freshwater ecosystems, however, is largely unknown, confounding assessments of their role in the global N-cycle. Here we report the activity and diversity of anammox bacteria in the world's largest freshwater lake - Lake Superior. We found that anammox performed by previously undiscovered bacteria is an important contributor to sediment N2 production. We observed striking differences in the anammox bacterial populations found at different locations within Lake Superior and those described from other locations. Our data thus reveal that novel anammox bacteria underpin N-loss from Lake Superior, and if more broadly distributed across inland waters would play an important role in continental N-cycling and mitigation of fixed nitrogen transfer from land to the sea.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleNovel anammox bacteria and nitrogen loss from Lake Superior-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-12270-1-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85032201844-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 13757, p. 1-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 13757, p. 7-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats