File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: BRCA mutation testing for ovarian cancer in the context of available targeted therapy: Survey and consensus of Hong Kong specialists

TitleBRCA mutation testing for ovarian cancer in the context of available targeted therapy: Survey and consensus of Hong Kong specialists
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1743-7563
Citation
Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractAims BRCA mutation (BRCAmut) testing is an important tool for the risk assessment, prevention and early diagnosis of breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC), and more recently, for determining patient susceptibility to targeted therapy. This study assessed the current BRCAmut testing patterns and explored physicians’ perspectives on the utilities and optimal sequencing of the testing, in order to facilitate and standardize testing practices. Methods Medical specialists in BC and OC in Hong Kong were invited to complete a questionnaire on BRCAmut testing practices. A panel of specialists with extensive BRCAmut testing experience was also convened to develop consensus statements on testing, using the Delphi method and an anonymous electronic voting system. Results The survey respondents (n = 71) recognized family history (FH) of BC and/or OC and an early age of onset as key factors for referring BRCAmut testing. The proportion of respondents who would test all OCs regardless of FH or age, as per the recent international guideline, was low (28.2%). The largest hurdles to testing were the cost, as well as the availability of next‐generation sequencing‐accredited testing and genetic counseling facilities. The panelists suggested that the sequence of somatic testing followed by germline testing may help address both the imminent need of treatment planning and longer term hereditary implications. The potential emotional and financial burdens of BRCAmut testing should be weighed against the potential therapeutic benefits, and the type and timing of testing personalized. Conclusions Accessibility of BRCAmut testing to all at‐risk individuals will be achievable through improvements in testing affordability, as well as widened availability of accredited testing and genetic counseling facilities.
DescriptionLink to Free access
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269423
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.494
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.554

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwong, A-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, DKL-
dc.contributor.authorHsue, CC-
dc.contributor.authorHui, SK-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, RCY-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KC-
dc.contributor.authorNgan, KCR-
dc.contributor.authorSoong, SI-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-24T08:07:24Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-24T08:07:24Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationAsia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2019-
dc.identifier.issn1743-7555-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269423-
dc.descriptionLink to Free access-
dc.description.abstractAims BRCA mutation (BRCAmut) testing is an important tool for the risk assessment, prevention and early diagnosis of breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC), and more recently, for determining patient susceptibility to targeted therapy. This study assessed the current BRCAmut testing patterns and explored physicians’ perspectives on the utilities and optimal sequencing of the testing, in order to facilitate and standardize testing practices. Methods Medical specialists in BC and OC in Hong Kong were invited to complete a questionnaire on BRCAmut testing practices. A panel of specialists with extensive BRCAmut testing experience was also convened to develop consensus statements on testing, using the Delphi method and an anonymous electronic voting system. Results The survey respondents (n = 71) recognized family history (FH) of BC and/or OC and an early age of onset as key factors for referring BRCAmut testing. The proportion of respondents who would test all OCs regardless of FH or age, as per the recent international guideline, was low (28.2%). The largest hurdles to testing were the cost, as well as the availability of next‐generation sequencing‐accredited testing and genetic counseling facilities. The panelists suggested that the sequence of somatic testing followed by germline testing may help address both the imminent need of treatment planning and longer term hereditary implications. The potential emotional and financial burdens of BRCAmut testing should be weighed against the potential therapeutic benefits, and the type and timing of testing personalized. Conclusions Accessibility of BRCAmut testing to all at‐risk individuals will be achievable through improvements in testing affordability, as well as widened availability of accredited testing and genetic counseling facilities.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1743-7563-
dc.relation.ispartofAsia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.titleBRCA mutation testing for ovarian cancer in the context of available targeted therapy: Survey and consensus of Hong Kong specialists-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKwong, A: avakwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, DKL: klcheng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, RCY: leungrcy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNgan, KCR: rkcngan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSoong, SI: issoong@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, A=rp01734-
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, KCR=rp02371-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ajco.13116-
dc.identifier.hkuros297363-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats