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Book Chapter: Maintaining disturbance-dependent habitats

TitleMaintaining disturbance-dependent habitats
Authors
KeywordsFire regime
Herbivory
Prescribed burning
Reintroduction
Disturbance-dependent habitats
Disturbances
Issue Date2015
Citation
Maintaining disturbance-dependent habitats. In Pereira, HM, Navarro, L (Eds.), Rewilding European Landscapes, p. 143-167. Springer International Publishing, 2015 How to Cite?
Abstract© The Author(s) 2015. Natural disturbances, or the lack thereof, contributed to shape Earth’s landscapes and maintain its diversity of ecosystems. In particular, natural fire dynamics and herbivory by wild megafauna played an essential role in defining European landscapes in pre-agricultural times. The advent of agriculture and the development of complex societies exacerbated the decline of European megafauna, leading to local and global extinctions of many species, and substantial alterations of fire regimes. Those natural phenomena were over time gradually and steadily replaced by anthropogenic disturbances. Yet, for the first time since the Black Death epidemic, agricultural land-use is decreasing in Europe. Less productive marginal areas have been progressively abandoned as crop and livestock production has become concentrated on the most fertile and easier to cultivate land. With little or no substitute for the anthropogenic disturbances associated with these abandoned agricultural practices, there is growing concern that disturbance-dependent communities may disappear, along with their associated ecosystem services. Nonetheless, rewilding can give an opportunity to tackle the issue of farmland abandonment. This chapter first depicts the historical European landscapes and the role of two natural disturbances, herbivory and fire. The importance of disturbance-dependent habitats is then highlighted by drawing attention to the alpha and beta diversity that they sustain. Finally, the chapter investigates options for rewilding abandoned land to maintain disturbance-dependent and self-sustained habitats for which we suggest active restoration in the early stages of abandonment. This may be achieved via prescribed burning and support or introduction, when necessary, of populations of wild mammals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268621
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNavarro, Laetitia M.-
dc.contributor.authorProença, Vânia-
dc.contributor.authorKaplan, Jed O.-
dc.contributor.authorPereira, Henrique M.-
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-25T08:00:14Z-
dc.date.available2019-03-25T08:00:14Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationMaintaining disturbance-dependent habitats. In Pereira, HM, Navarro, L (Eds.), Rewilding European Landscapes, p. 143-167. Springer International Publishing, 2015-
dc.identifier.isbn9783319120386-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268621-
dc.description.abstract© The Author(s) 2015. Natural disturbances, or the lack thereof, contributed to shape Earth’s landscapes and maintain its diversity of ecosystems. In particular, natural fire dynamics and herbivory by wild megafauna played an essential role in defining European landscapes in pre-agricultural times. The advent of agriculture and the development of complex societies exacerbated the decline of European megafauna, leading to local and global extinctions of many species, and substantial alterations of fire regimes. Those natural phenomena were over time gradually and steadily replaced by anthropogenic disturbances. Yet, for the first time since the Black Death epidemic, agricultural land-use is decreasing in Europe. Less productive marginal areas have been progressively abandoned as crop and livestock production has become concentrated on the most fertile and easier to cultivate land. With little or no substitute for the anthropogenic disturbances associated with these abandoned agricultural practices, there is growing concern that disturbance-dependent communities may disappear, along with their associated ecosystem services. Nonetheless, rewilding can give an opportunity to tackle the issue of farmland abandonment. This chapter first depicts the historical European landscapes and the role of two natural disturbances, herbivory and fire. The importance of disturbance-dependent habitats is then highlighted by drawing attention to the alpha and beta diversity that they sustain. Finally, the chapter investigates options for rewilding abandoned land to maintain disturbance-dependent and self-sustained habitats for which we suggest active restoration in the early stages of abandonment. This may be achieved via prescribed burning and support or introduction, when necessary, of populations of wild mammals.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofRewilding European Landscapes-
dc.subjectFire regime-
dc.subjectHerbivory-
dc.subjectPrescribed burning-
dc.subjectReintroduction-
dc.subjectDisturbance-dependent habitats-
dc.subjectDisturbances-
dc.titleMaintaining disturbance-dependent habitats-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-12039-3_8-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84937075596-
dc.identifier.spage143-
dc.identifier.epage167-

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