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Article: Cognitive function in children who receive organ transplantation

TitleCognitive function in children who receive organ transplantation
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.html
Citation
Health Psychology, 1994, v. 13 n. 1, p. 3-13 How to Cite?
AbstractThe number of children who undergo cardiac, renal, and liver transplantation continues to increase. This review of the literature describing their cognitive function indicates that deficits ranging from gross IQ delay to subtle neuropsychological dysfunction are present in some of these children both before and after transplantation. However, with the exception of certain definite contributors to vulnerability, such as cyanotic heart disease, early onset of disease, and growth deficits in infancy (particularly in head circumference and height), the correlates of cognitive deficits are not clear. Problems with determining contributing variables include significant heterogeneity within study populations, difficulties obtaining appropriate control groups, and the need for longitudinal, long-term studies. Additional research is required to address limitations of past studies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267854
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.177
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.915

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStewart, SM-
dc.contributor.authorKennard, BD-
dc.contributor.authorWaller, DA-
dc.contributor.authorFixler, D-
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-05T07:50:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-03-05T07:50:28Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.citationHealth Psychology, 1994, v. 13 n. 1, p. 3-13-
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267854-
dc.description.abstractThe number of children who undergo cardiac, renal, and liver transplantation continues to increase. This review of the literature describing their cognitive function indicates that deficits ranging from gross IQ delay to subtle neuropsychological dysfunction are present in some of these children both before and after transplantation. However, with the exception of certain definite contributors to vulnerability, such as cyanotic heart disease, early onset of disease, and growth deficits in infancy (particularly in head circumference and height), the correlates of cognitive deficits are not clear. Problems with determining contributing variables include significant heterogeneity within study populations, difficulties obtaining appropriate control groups, and the need for longitudinal, long-term studies. Additional research is required to address limitations of past studies.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.html-
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Psychology-
dc.rightsHealth Psychology. Copyright © American Psychological Association.-
dc.rightsThis article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders-
dc.subject.meshHeart Transplantation-
dc.subject.meshKidney Transplantation-
dc.subject.meshLiver Transplantation-
dc.titleCognitive function in children who receive organ transplantation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailStewart, SM: smstewar@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0278-6133.13.1.3-
dc.identifier.pmid8168468-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028190166-
dc.identifier.hkuros1378-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage3-
dc.identifier.epage13-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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