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Article: Self-stigma, stigma coping and functioning in remitted bipolar disorder

TitleSelf-stigma, stigma coping and functioning in remitted bipolar disorder
Authors
KeywordsStigma
Self-stigma
Functioning
Stigma coping
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/genhospsych
Citation
General Hospital Psychiatry, 2019, v. 57, p. 7-12 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Stigma has a deleterious effect on functioning in individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). However, there has been no research investigating how stigma coping predicts self-stigma and functioning in BD. Furthermore, how different stages of self-stigma might affect functioning is unclear. The following hypotheses were examined: (1) Stigma coping by withdrawal and secrecy was associated with more self-stigma; (2) Stigma coping by withdrawal and secrecy was associated with worse social functioning; and (3) Later stages of self-stigma were associated with worse social functioning. Methods: A random sample of remitted BD in a regional psychiatric clinic was examined using a cross-sectional design (n = 115). Self-stigma was measured using the Chinese versions of Self-Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (C-SSMIS). Social functioning was assessed using the Functional Assessment Short Test (FAST). Stigma coping was evaluated using the Stigma Coping Orientation Scale (SCOS). Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed that coping by secrecy was associated with the stereotype agreement subscale of C-SSMIS, while coping by withdrawal was associated with the C-SSMIS self-concurrence and self-esteem decrement subscales. Another regression analysis showed that FAST total score was associated with the self-esteem decrement subscale of C-SSMIS and the severity of depressive and manic symptoms. Conclusion: We showed that self-esteem decrement, the final stage of self-stigma, was the most crucial stage in determining psychosocial functioning. Our findings suggested that stigma-reduction intervention should be arranged during the early stage of BD and targeted at various dysfunctional stigma coping.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266511
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.86
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.871
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, CH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, SMC-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CW-
dc.contributor.authorWong, MC-
dc.contributor.authorChung, KF-
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-18T08:21:07Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-18T08:21:07Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationGeneral Hospital Psychiatry, 2019, v. 57, p. 7-12-
dc.identifier.issn0163-8343-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266511-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Stigma has a deleterious effect on functioning in individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). However, there has been no research investigating how stigma coping predicts self-stigma and functioning in BD. Furthermore, how different stages of self-stigma might affect functioning is unclear. The following hypotheses were examined: (1) Stigma coping by withdrawal and secrecy was associated with more self-stigma; (2) Stigma coping by withdrawal and secrecy was associated with worse social functioning; and (3) Later stages of self-stigma were associated with worse social functioning. Methods: A random sample of remitted BD in a regional psychiatric clinic was examined using a cross-sectional design (n = 115). Self-stigma was measured using the Chinese versions of Self-Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (C-SSMIS). Social functioning was assessed using the Functional Assessment Short Test (FAST). Stigma coping was evaluated using the Stigma Coping Orientation Scale (SCOS). Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed that coping by secrecy was associated with the stereotype agreement subscale of C-SSMIS, while coping by withdrawal was associated with the C-SSMIS self-concurrence and self-esteem decrement subscales. Another regression analysis showed that FAST total score was associated with the self-esteem decrement subscale of C-SSMIS and the severity of depressive and manic symptoms. Conclusion: We showed that self-esteem decrement, the final stage of self-stigma, was the most crucial stage in determining psychosocial functioning. Our findings suggested that stigma-reduction intervention should be arranged during the early stage of BD and targeted at various dysfunctional stigma coping.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/genhospsych-
dc.relation.ispartofGeneral Hospital Psychiatry-
dc.subjectStigma-
dc.subjectSelf-stigma-
dc.subjectFunctioning-
dc.subjectStigma coping-
dc.titleSelf-stigma, stigma coping and functioning in remitted bipolar disorder-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, SMC: wongcsm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2018.12.007-
dc.identifier.pmid30654294-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85059449799-
dc.identifier.hkuros296689-
dc.identifier.volume57-
dc.identifier.spage7-
dc.identifier.epage12-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000465378900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl0163-8343-

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