File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A candidate super-Earth planet orbiting near the snow line of Barnard’s star

TitleA candidate super-Earth planet orbiting near the snow line of Barnard’s star
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature
Citation
Nature, 2018, v. 563, p. 365-380 How to Cite?
AbstractBarnard’s star is a red dwarf, and has the largest proper motion (apparent motion across the sky) of all known stars. At a distance of 1.8 parsecs1, it is the closest single star to the Sun; only the three stars in the α Centauri system are closer. Barnard’s star is also among the least magnetically active red dwarfs known2,3 and has an estimated age older than the Solar System. Its properties make it a prime target for planetary searches; various techniques with different sensitivity limits have been used previously, including radial-velocity imaging4,5,6, astrometry7,8 and direct imaging9, but all ultimately led to negative or null results. Here we combine numerous measurements from high-precision radial-velocity instruments, revealing the presence of a low-amplitude periodic signal with a period of 233 days. Independent photometric and spectroscopic monitoring, as well as an analysis of instrumental systematic effects, suggest that this signal is best explained as arising from a planetary companion. The candidate planet around Barnard’s star is a cold super-Earth, with a minimum mass of 3.2 times that of Earth, orbiting near its snow line (the minimum distance from the star at which volatile compounds could condense). The combination of all radial-velocity datasets spanning 20 years of measurements additionally reveals a long-term modulation that could arise from a stellar magnetic-activity cycle or from a more distant planetary object. Because of its proximity to the Sun, the candidate planet has a maximum angular separation of 220 milliarcseconds from Barnard’s star, making it an excellent target for direct imaging and astrometric observations in the future.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266005
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 41.577
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 21.936
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRibas, I-
dc.contributor.authorTuomi, M-
dc.contributor.authorReiners, A-
dc.contributor.authorButler, RP-
dc.contributor.authorMorales, JC-
dc.contributor.authorPerger, M-
dc.contributor.authorDreizler, S-
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-López, C-
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Hernández, JI-
dc.contributor.authorRosich, A-
dc.contributor.authorFeng, F-
dc.contributor.authorTrifonov, T-
dc.contributor.authorVogt, S-
dc.contributor.authorCaballero, JA-
dc.contributor.authorHatzes, A-
dc.contributor.authorHerrero, E-
dc.contributor.authorJeffers, SV-
dc.contributor.authorLafarga, M-
dc.contributor.authorMurgas, F-
dc.contributor.authorNelson, RP-
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez, E-
dc.contributor.authorStrachan, JBP-
dc.contributor.authorTal-Or, L-
dc.contributor.authorTeske, J-
dc.contributor.authorToledo-Padrón, B-
dc.contributor.authorZechmeister, M-
dc.contributor.authorQuirrenbach, A-
dc.contributor.authorAmado, PJ-
dc.contributor.authorAzzaro, M-
dc.contributor.authorBéjar, VJS-
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, JR-
dc.contributor.authorBerdiñas, ZM-
dc.contributor.authorBurt, J-
dc.contributor.authorColeman, G-
dc.contributor.authorCortés-Contreras, M-
dc.contributor.authorCrane, J-
dc.contributor.authorEngle, SG-
dc.contributor.authorGuinan, EF-
dc.contributor.authorHaswell, CA-
dc.contributor.authorHenning, T-
dc.contributor.authorHolden, B-
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, J-
dc.contributor.authorJones, HRA-
dc.contributor.authorKaminski, A-
dc.contributor.authorKiraga, M-
dc.contributor.authorKürster, M-
dc.contributor.authorLee, MH-
dc.contributor.authorLópez-González, MJ-
dc.contributor.authorMontes, D-
dc.contributor.authorMorin, J-
dc.contributor.authorOfir, A-
dc.contributor.authorPallé, E-
dc.contributor.authorRebolo, R-
dc.contributor.authorReffert, S-
dc.contributor.authorSchweitzer, A-
dc.contributor.authorSeifert, W-
dc.contributor.authorShectman, SA-
dc.contributor.authorStaab, D-
dc.contributor.authorStreet, RA-
dc.contributor.authorSuárez Mascareño, A-
dc.contributor.authorTsapras, Y-
dc.contributor.authorWang, SX-
dc.contributor.authorAnglada-Escudé, G-
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T02:16:30Z-
dc.date.available2018-12-17T02:16:30Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationNature, 2018, v. 563, p. 365-380-
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266005-
dc.description.abstractBarnard’s star is a red dwarf, and has the largest proper motion (apparent motion across the sky) of all known stars. At a distance of 1.8 parsecs1, it is the closest single star to the Sun; only the three stars in the α Centauri system are closer. Barnard’s star is also among the least magnetically active red dwarfs known2,3 and has an estimated age older than the Solar System. Its properties make it a prime target for planetary searches; various techniques with different sensitivity limits have been used previously, including radial-velocity imaging4,5,6, astrometry7,8 and direct imaging9, but all ultimately led to negative or null results. Here we combine numerous measurements from high-precision radial-velocity instruments, revealing the presence of a low-amplitude periodic signal with a period of 233 days. Independent photometric and spectroscopic monitoring, as well as an analysis of instrumental systematic effects, suggest that this signal is best explained as arising from a planetary companion. The candidate planet around Barnard’s star is a cold super-Earth, with a minimum mass of 3.2 times that of Earth, orbiting near its snow line (the minimum distance from the star at which volatile compounds could condense). The combination of all radial-velocity datasets spanning 20 years of measurements additionally reveals a long-term modulation that could arise from a stellar magnetic-activity cycle or from a more distant planetary object. Because of its proximity to the Sun, the candidate planet has a maximum angular separation of 220 milliarcseconds from Barnard’s star, making it an excellent target for direct imaging and astrometric observations in the future.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature-
dc.relation.ispartofNature-
dc.titleA candidate super-Earth planet orbiting near the snow line of Barnard’s star-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, MH: mhlee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, MH=rp00724-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41586-018-0677-y-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85056565793-
dc.identifier.hkuros296302-
dc.identifier.volume563-
dc.identifier.issue7731-
dc.identifier.spage365-
dc.identifier.epage380-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000450048400052-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats