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Article: Electroacupuncture for tapering off long-term benzodiazepine use: A randomized controlled trial

TitleElectroacupuncture for tapering off long-term benzodiazepine use: A randomized controlled trial
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpsychires
Citation
Journal of Psychiatric Research, 2018, v. 109, p. 59-67 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate the efficacy of using electroacupuncture as an adjunct treatment in enhancing the benzodiazepine cessation rate in long-term benzodiazepine users. Methods: This was a randomized, assessor- and subject-blinded, controlled trial. One hundred and forty-four long-term benzodiazepine users were randomly assigned to receive either electroacupuncture or placebo acupuncture (a sham itervention using non-invasive placebo needles) combined with a gradual benzodiazepine tapering schedule for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was the cessation rate of benzodiazepine use. Subjects were assessed on their benzodiazepine usage, benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms, insomnia severity, and anxiety and depressive symptoms at baseline, week 6 and week 16. Results: The cessation rates of the electroacupuncture and placebo acupuncture groups at 12 weeks post-treatment were 9.17% and 10.83%, respectively. Both groups showed a reduction in benzodiazepine usage by a self-completed drug record at week 16 (compared to baseline: electroacupuncture group −40.23% versus placebo acupuncture group −48.76%). However, no significant between-group differences were found in the benzodiazepine cessation rate, reduction in benzodiazepine usage, and other secondary measures across all the study time points. Conclusions: Electroacupuncture showed a similar cessation rate in benzodiazepine use to that of non-invasive placebo acupuncture in long-term users during a 4-week gradual tapering schedule. The evidence did not support advantages of electroacupuncture over non-invasive placebo acupuncture on reducing insomnia, anxiety, depression, or other withdrawal symptoms during the gradual tapering schedule. Despite a 40% decrease in the benzodiazepine usage in both groups, the effects may be attributed to the non-specific effects of acupuncture. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT02475538.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265947
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.265
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WF-
dc.contributor.authorChung, KF-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Z-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, SP-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WC-
dc.contributor.authorNg, RMK-
dc.contributor.authorChan, LWC-
dc.contributor.authorHo, LM-
dc.contributor.authorYu, BYM-
dc.contributor.authorChau, JCS-
dc.contributor.authorLau, NCL-
dc.contributor.authorLao, L-
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T02:16:20Z-
dc.date.available2018-12-17T02:16:20Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Psychiatric Research, 2018, v. 109, p. 59-67-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3956-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265947-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the efficacy of using electroacupuncture as an adjunct treatment in enhancing the benzodiazepine cessation rate in long-term benzodiazepine users. Methods: This was a randomized, assessor- and subject-blinded, controlled trial. One hundred and forty-four long-term benzodiazepine users were randomly assigned to receive either electroacupuncture or placebo acupuncture (a sham itervention using non-invasive placebo needles) combined with a gradual benzodiazepine tapering schedule for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was the cessation rate of benzodiazepine use. Subjects were assessed on their benzodiazepine usage, benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms, insomnia severity, and anxiety and depressive symptoms at baseline, week 6 and week 16. Results: The cessation rates of the electroacupuncture and placebo acupuncture groups at 12 weeks post-treatment were 9.17% and 10.83%, respectively. Both groups showed a reduction in benzodiazepine usage by a self-completed drug record at week 16 (compared to baseline: electroacupuncture group −40.23% versus placebo acupuncture group −48.76%). However, no significant between-group differences were found in the benzodiazepine cessation rate, reduction in benzodiazepine usage, and other secondary measures across all the study time points. Conclusions: Electroacupuncture showed a similar cessation rate in benzodiazepine use to that of non-invasive placebo acupuncture in long-term users during a 4-week gradual tapering schedule. The evidence did not support advantages of electroacupuncture over non-invasive placebo acupuncture on reducing insomnia, anxiety, depression, or other withdrawal symptoms during the gradual tapering schedule. Despite a 40% decrease in the benzodiazepine usage in both groups, the effects may be attributed to the non-specific effects of acupuncture. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov # NCT02475538.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jpsychires-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Psychiatric Research-
dc.titleElectroacupuncture for tapering off long-term benzodiazepine use: A randomized controlled trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, Z: zhangzj@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, WC: waicchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM: lmho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, Z=rp01297-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, WC=rp01687-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360-
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.11.015-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85057326851-
dc.identifier.hkuros296293-
dc.identifier.volume109-
dc.identifier.spage59-
dc.identifier.epage67-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000456761200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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