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Article: In vivo characterization of brain ultrashort-T2 components

TitleIn vivo characterization of brain ultrashort-T2 components
Authors
Keywordsultrashort-T 2
myelin imaging
myelin membranes
relaxometry
ultrashort echo time MRI
Issue Date2018
Citation
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 2018, v. 80, n. 2, p. 726-735 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Purpose: Recent nuclear magnetic resonance and MRI studies have measured a fast-relaxing signal component with T2*< 1 ms in white matter and myelin extracts. In ex vivo studies, evidence suggests that a large fraction of this component directly arises from bound protons in the myelin phospholipid membranes. Based on these results, this ultrashort-T2component in nervous tissue is a new potential imaging biomarker of myelination, which plays a critical role in neuronal signal conduction across the brain and loss or degradation of myelin is a key feature of many neurological disorders. The goal of this work was to characterize the relaxation times and frequency shifts of ultrashort-T2components in the human brain. Methods: This required development of an ultrashort echo time relaxometry acquisition strategy and fitting procedure for robust measurements in the presence of ultrashort T2relaxation times and large frequency shifts. Results: We measured an ultrashort-T2component in healthy volunteers with a median T2*between 0.5–0.7 ms at 3T and 0.2–0.3 ms at 7T as well as an approximately −3 ppm frequency shift from water. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first time a chemical shift of the ultrashort-T2brain component has been measured in vivo. This chemical shift, at around 1.7 ppm, is similar to the primary resonance of most lipids, indicating that much of the ultrashort-T2component observed in vivo arises from bound protons in the myelin phospholipid membranes. Magn Reson Med 80:726–735, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265729
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.082
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.197
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBoucneau, Tanguy-
dc.contributor.authorCao, Peng-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Shuyu-
dc.contributor.authorHan, Misung-
dc.contributor.authorXu, Duan-
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Roland G.-
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Peder E.Z.-
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-03T01:21:31Z-
dc.date.available2018-12-03T01:21:31Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationMagnetic Resonance in Medicine, 2018, v. 80, n. 2, p. 726-735-
dc.identifier.issn0740-3194-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265729-
dc.description.abstract© 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Purpose: Recent nuclear magnetic resonance and MRI studies have measured a fast-relaxing signal component with T2*< 1 ms in white matter and myelin extracts. In ex vivo studies, evidence suggests that a large fraction of this component directly arises from bound protons in the myelin phospholipid membranes. Based on these results, this ultrashort-T2component in nervous tissue is a new potential imaging biomarker of myelination, which plays a critical role in neuronal signal conduction across the brain and loss or degradation of myelin is a key feature of many neurological disorders. The goal of this work was to characterize the relaxation times and frequency shifts of ultrashort-T2components in the human brain. Methods: This required development of an ultrashort echo time relaxometry acquisition strategy and fitting procedure for robust measurements in the presence of ultrashort T2relaxation times and large frequency shifts. Results: We measured an ultrashort-T2component in healthy volunteers with a median T2*between 0.5–0.7 ms at 3T and 0.2–0.3 ms at 7T as well as an approximately −3 ppm frequency shift from water. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first time a chemical shift of the ultrashort-T2brain component has been measured in vivo. This chemical shift, at around 1.7 ppm, is similar to the primary resonance of most lipids, indicating that much of the ultrashort-T2component observed in vivo arises from bound protons in the myelin phospholipid membranes. Magn Reson Med 80:726–735, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofMagnetic Resonance in Medicine-
dc.subjectultrashort-T 2-
dc.subjectmyelin imaging-
dc.subjectmyelin membranes-
dc.subjectrelaxometry-
dc.subjectultrashort echo time MRI-
dc.titleIn vivo characterization of brain ultrashort-T2 components-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mrm.27037-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85036499944-
dc.identifier.volume80-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage726-
dc.identifier.epage735-
dc.identifier.eissn1522-2594-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000430469300031-

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