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Article: Advances in the classification of pediatric brain tumors through DNA methylation profiling: from research tool to frontline diagnostic

TitleAdvances in the classification of pediatric brain tumors through DNA methylation profiling: from research tool to frontline diagnostic
Authors
KeywordsEpigenetics
Methylation
Molecular pathology
Neuro-oncology
Pediatric central nervous system tumors
Issue Date2018
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28741
Citation
Cancer, 2018, v. 124 n. 21, p. 4168-4180 How to Cite?
AbstractDespite significant improvements in pediatric brain tumor therapy and outcome, too many children still die of disease, and too many survivors experience significant sequelae as a result of conventional therapies. The molecular characterization of pediatric brain tumors has afforded tremendous insight into the basic biology and clinical management of these deadly childhood diseases. Genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptional profiling have facilitated the identification of significant heterogeneity among previously uniform disease entities. In particular, DNA methylation profiling has emerged as a robust tool for identifying key disease‐specific subgroups that can exhibit distinct clinical outcomes. These approaches, which also complement classic histologic techniques, can suggest key mechanistic underpinnings of tumorigenesis and open the door for better informed and more tailored therapy. By leveraging the results of large‐scale classifications of disease cohorts, novel driver mutations and pathways can be uncovered, enabling the generation of faithful animal models, promoting targeted drug design, informing developmental biology, and ultimately translating into improved clinical management. In this review, progress in the epigenetic classification of common malignant pediatric brain tumors, namely medulloblastoma, ependymoma, high‐grade glioma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, and central nervous system embryonal tumors, will be discussed, and the potential role of DNA methylation profiling as a frontline diagnostic modality will be emphasized.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265278
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 6.537
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.188
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKumar, R-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, APY-
dc.contributor.authorOrr, BA-
dc.contributor.authorNorthcott, PA-
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, GW-
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T02:03:32Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-20T02:03:32Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationCancer, 2018, v. 124 n. 21, p. 4168-4180-
dc.identifier.issn0008-543X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265278-
dc.description.abstractDespite significant improvements in pediatric brain tumor therapy and outcome, too many children still die of disease, and too many survivors experience significant sequelae as a result of conventional therapies. The molecular characterization of pediatric brain tumors has afforded tremendous insight into the basic biology and clinical management of these deadly childhood diseases. Genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptional profiling have facilitated the identification of significant heterogeneity among previously uniform disease entities. In particular, DNA methylation profiling has emerged as a robust tool for identifying key disease‐specific subgroups that can exhibit distinct clinical outcomes. These approaches, which also complement classic histologic techniques, can suggest key mechanistic underpinnings of tumorigenesis and open the door for better informed and more tailored therapy. By leveraging the results of large‐scale classifications of disease cohorts, novel driver mutations and pathways can be uncovered, enabling the generation of faithful animal models, promoting targeted drug design, informing developmental biology, and ultimately translating into improved clinical management. In this review, progress in the epigenetic classification of common malignant pediatric brain tumors, namely medulloblastoma, ependymoma, high‐grade glioma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, and central nervous system embryonal tumors, will be discussed, and the potential role of DNA methylation profiling as a frontline diagnostic modality will be emphasized.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28741-
dc.relation.ispartofCancer-
dc.subjectEpigenetics-
dc.subjectMethylation-
dc.subjectMolecular pathology-
dc.subjectNeuro-oncology-
dc.subjectPediatric central nervous system tumors-
dc.titleAdvances in the classification of pediatric brain tumors through DNA methylation profiling: from research tool to frontline diagnostic-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, APY: apyliu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, APY=rp01357-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/cncr.31583-
dc.identifier.pmid30255939-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6263826-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85053844733-
dc.identifier.hkuros295911-
dc.identifier.volume124-
dc.identifier.issue21-
dc.identifier.spage4168-
dc.identifier.epage4180-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000451203300012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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