File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Perceptual Experience Shapes our Ability to Categorise Faces by National Origin: A New Other-Race Effect

TitlePerceptual Experience Shapes our Ability to Categorise Faces by National Origin: A New Other-Race Effect
Authors
KeywordsCategorisation task
Experience
Face perception
Other-race effect
Perceptual expertise
Issue Date2018
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jBP_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal of Psychology, 2018, v. 109 n. 3, p. 583-603 How to Cite?
AbstractPeople are better at recognizing own-race than other-race faces. This other-race effect has been argued to be the result of perceptual expertise, whereby face-specific perceptual mechanisms are tuned through experience. We designed new tasks to determine whether other-race effects extend to categorizing faces by national origin. We began by selecting sets of face stimuli for these tasks that are typical in appearance for each of six nations (three Caucasian, three Asian) according to people from those nations (Study 1). Caucasian and Asian participants then categorized these faces by national origin (Study 2). Own-race faces were categorized more accurately than other-race faces. In contrast, Asian American participants, with more extensive other-race experience than the first Asian group, categorized other-race faces better than own-race faces, demonstrating a reversal of the other-race effect. Therefore, other-race effects extend to the ability to categorize faces by national origin, but only if participants have greater perceptual experience with own-race, than other-race faces. Study 3 ruled out non-perceptual accounts by showing that Caucasian and Asian faces were sorted more accurately by own-race than other-race participants, even in a sorting task without any explicit labelling required. Together, our results demonstrate a new other-race effect in sensitivity to national origin of faces that is linked to perceptual expertise.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265062
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.507
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.105
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThorup, B-
dc.contributor.authorCrookes, K-
dc.contributor.authorChang, PPW-
dc.contributor.authorBurton, N-
dc.contributor.authorPond, S-
dc.contributor.authorLI, TK-
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHW-
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, G-
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T01:59:26Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-20T01:59:26Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Psychology, 2018, v. 109 n. 3, p. 583-603-
dc.identifier.issn0007-1269-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265062-
dc.description.abstractPeople are better at recognizing own-race than other-race faces. This other-race effect has been argued to be the result of perceptual expertise, whereby face-specific perceptual mechanisms are tuned through experience. We designed new tasks to determine whether other-race effects extend to categorizing faces by national origin. We began by selecting sets of face stimuli for these tasks that are typical in appearance for each of six nations (three Caucasian, three Asian) according to people from those nations (Study 1). Caucasian and Asian participants then categorized these faces by national origin (Study 2). Own-race faces were categorized more accurately than other-race faces. In contrast, Asian American participants, with more extensive other-race experience than the first Asian group, categorized other-race faces better than own-race faces, demonstrating a reversal of the other-race effect. Therefore, other-race effects extend to the ability to categorize faces by national origin, but only if participants have greater perceptual experience with own-race, than other-race faces. Study 3 ruled out non-perceptual accounts by showing that Caucasian and Asian faces were sorted more accurately by own-race than other-race participants, even in a sorting task without any explicit labelling required. Together, our results demonstrate a new other-race effect in sensitivity to national origin of faces that is linked to perceptual expertise.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jBP_1.cfm-
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Psychology-
dc.subjectCategorisation task-
dc.subjectExperience-
dc.subjectFace perception-
dc.subjectOther-race effect-
dc.subjectPerceptual expertise-
dc.titlePerceptual Experience Shapes our Ability to Categorise Faces by National Origin: A New Other-Race Effect-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHsiao, JHW: jhsiao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHsiao, JHW=rp00632-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjop.12289-
dc.identifier.pmid29473146-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85042360182-
dc.identifier.hkuros295943-
dc.identifier.volume109-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage583-
dc.identifier.epage603-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000437266200015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats