File Download
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Young night drifters in Sham Shui Po

TitleYoung night drifters in Sham Shui Po
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Yeung, C. S. [楊卡娜]. (2018). Young night drifters in Sham Shui Po. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThis research sought to understand the young night drifting phenomenon in Sham Shui Po from an alternative perspective. Building on previous temporal research of young night drifters, this project aimed to challenge the conventional approach of understanding night drifting activities by considering the wider implications of social and physical environments. The sociological elements − time scheduling, space interpretations and gender performances − will be discussed to investigate how young night drifting behaviour should be understood and analysed. The data of this research came from three paired in-depth interviews with six participants recruited through the local agency serving young night drifters in Sham Shui Po. The research findings uncovered that the time schedules among youngsters are generated by negotiations with various social institutions, personal relations and gender constructions. Together with the personal experiences of living conditions and spaces in Sham Shui Po, all of the above factors contribute to the establishment of night-time activities. This study has shown that rather than being a form of juvenile delinquency, the night drifting phenomenon among youngsters is merely a reaction to the social segregations and constraints of time, space and gender.
DegreeMaster of Social Sciences
SubjectDrifters - China - Sham Shui Po
Dept/ProgramCriminology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/264842

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Carla Siobhan-
dc.contributor.author楊卡娜-
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-31T03:01:24Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-31T03:01:24Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationYeung, C. S. [楊卡娜]. (2018). Young night drifters in Sham Shui Po. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/264842-
dc.description.abstractThis research sought to understand the young night drifting phenomenon in Sham Shui Po from an alternative perspective. Building on previous temporal research of young night drifters, this project aimed to challenge the conventional approach of understanding night drifting activities by considering the wider implications of social and physical environments. The sociological elements − time scheduling, space interpretations and gender performances − will be discussed to investigate how young night drifting behaviour should be understood and analysed. The data of this research came from three paired in-depth interviews with six participants recruited through the local agency serving young night drifters in Sham Shui Po. The research findings uncovered that the time schedules among youngsters are generated by negotiations with various social institutions, personal relations and gender constructions. Together with the personal experiences of living conditions and spaces in Sham Shui Po, all of the above factors contribute to the establishment of night-time activities. This study has shown that rather than being a form of juvenile delinquency, the night drifting phenomenon among youngsters is merely a reaction to the social segregations and constraints of time, space and gender. -
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshDrifters - China - Sham Shui Po-
dc.titleYoung night drifters in Sham Shui Po-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Social Sciences-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineCriminology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2018-
dc.identifier.mmsid991044049989103414-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats