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Article: Promises and pitfalls of integrating home-based health services into Shanghai's elder-care system

TitlePromises and pitfalls of integrating home-based health services into Shanghai's elder-care system
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://titles.cambridge.org/journals/journal_catalogue.asp?historylinks=ALPHA&mnemonic=ASO
Citation
Ageing and Society, 2018, p. 1-21 How to Cite?
AbstractFaced with the dramatic pace of population ageing, the Shanghai municipal government launched a pilot programme in 2013 designed to address this and to strengthen ageing-in-place arrangements by providing basic in-home medical services for residents above the age of 80. Yet after a two-year trial run, the ‘Home-Based Medical Care Scheme for the Oldest-Old’ (HBMCSOO) policy remained significantly under-utilised despite the increasing demand for medical services. Our multi-disciplinary research team of social workers and anthropologists identified two key factors impeding the implementation of home-based medical care services: (a) the distortion of policy implementation and (b) the inadequate professionalisation of community-based elder-care workers. Based on our evaluation of the pilot programme, the Shanghai municipal government made several practical adjustments to improve the subsequent city-wide policy implemented in 2016. While these changes mostly focused on minor adjustments to improve in-home medical services for the oldest-old, they represent an encouraging first step towards our call for a holistic integrated care system whose design and delivery takes into account local political and social contexts, including existing institutional infrastructure and cultural expectations about care-giving responsibilities. The challenges of implementing Shanghai's HBMCSOO policy ultimately provide instructive lessons on best practices for integrating medical and social services in order to improve ageing-in-place measures in diverse local settings around the world.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/263835
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.62
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.870

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, YY-
dc.contributor.authorChen, HL-
dc.contributor.authorSong, PP-
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-22T07:45:13Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-22T07:45:13Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationAgeing and Society, 2018, p. 1-21-
dc.identifier.issn0144-686X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/263835-
dc.description.abstractFaced with the dramatic pace of population ageing, the Shanghai municipal government launched a pilot programme in 2013 designed to address this and to strengthen ageing-in-place arrangements by providing basic in-home medical services for residents above the age of 80. Yet after a two-year trial run, the ‘Home-Based Medical Care Scheme for the Oldest-Old’ (HBMCSOO) policy remained significantly under-utilised despite the increasing demand for medical services. Our multi-disciplinary research team of social workers and anthropologists identified two key factors impeding the implementation of home-based medical care services: (a) the distortion of policy implementation and (b) the inadequate professionalisation of community-based elder-care workers. Based on our evaluation of the pilot programme, the Shanghai municipal government made several practical adjustments to improve the subsequent city-wide policy implemented in 2016. While these changes mostly focused on minor adjustments to improve in-home medical services for the oldest-old, they represent an encouraging first step towards our call for a holistic integrated care system whose design and delivery takes into account local political and social contexts, including existing institutional infrastructure and cultural expectations about care-giving responsibilities. The challenges of implementing Shanghai's HBMCSOO policy ultimately provide instructive lessons on best practices for integrating medical and social services in order to improve ageing-in-place measures in diverse local settings around the world.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://titles.cambridge.org/journals/journal_catalogue.asp?historylinks=ALPHA&mnemonic=ASO-
dc.relation.ispartofAgeing and Society-
dc.rightsAgeing and Society. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsThis article has been published in a revised form in [Journal] [http://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © copyright holder.-
dc.titlePromises and pitfalls of integrating home-based health services into Shanghai's elder-care system-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSong, PP: songp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySong, PP=rp02412-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0144686X18001095-
dc.identifier.hkuros295564-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage21-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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