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Article: Age–period–cohort analysis of trends in blood pressure and body mass index in children and adolescents in Hong Kong

TitleAge–period–cohort analysis of trends in blood pressure and body mass index in children and adolescents in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordsage-period-cohort
blood pressure
child health
obesity
Issue Date2017
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2017, v. 71 n. 12, p. 1161-1167 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground The declining or fluctuating trend in blood pressure (BP) despite the rising trend in body mass index (BMI) during childhood and adolescence is unexplained. We decomposed trends in BP and BMI to identify the relevance of early-life and contemporaneous factors. Methods We assessed the relative contribution of age, period and cohort to secular trends in BP in children and adolescents (9-18 years) from 1999 to 2014 and BMI (6-18 years) from 1996 to 2014 in Hong Kong, China. Results After accounting for age, period effects contributed more than cohort effects to the overall fluctuating BP trend and the rising BMI trend observed in this Chinese population. For both sexes, BP fell from the start of period to a low point in 2003-2005 but then rose. BMI rose strongly across the period before levelling off in 2009-2010. Earlier cohorts (born in 1983-1984) had higher BP and BMI than later cohorts. Conclusion With globalisation and associated lifestyle changes, successive generations of children and adolescents in a recently developed Chinese setting had lower BP and BMI, but this fall was offset until recently by population-wide increase in BMI. School-based health promotion efforts could have partly mitigated the population-wide rise in child and adolescent BMI, while socioeconomic transition or other factors could be relevant to changes in BP between generations. Explaining these trends will help identify early-life factors that may contribute to a healthier start as well as contemporaneous factors that may protect against rising trends in adiposity. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/263793
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.973
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MK-
dc.contributor.authorTu, YK-
dc.contributor.authorKawachi, I-
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CM-
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-22T07:44:36Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-22T07:44:36Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 2017, v. 71 n. 12, p. 1161-1167-
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/263793-
dc.description.abstractBackground The declining or fluctuating trend in blood pressure (BP) despite the rising trend in body mass index (BMI) during childhood and adolescence is unexplained. We decomposed trends in BP and BMI to identify the relevance of early-life and contemporaneous factors. Methods We assessed the relative contribution of age, period and cohort to secular trends in BP in children and adolescents (9-18 years) from 1999 to 2014 and BMI (6-18 years) from 1996 to 2014 in Hong Kong, China. Results After accounting for age, period effects contributed more than cohort effects to the overall fluctuating BP trend and the rising BMI trend observed in this Chinese population. For both sexes, BP fell from the start of period to a low point in 2003-2005 but then rose. BMI rose strongly across the period before levelling off in 2009-2010. Earlier cohorts (born in 1983-1984) had higher BP and BMI than later cohorts. Conclusion With globalisation and associated lifestyle changes, successive generations of children and adolescents in a recently developed Chinese setting had lower BP and BMI, but this fall was offset until recently by population-wide increase in BMI. School-based health promotion efforts could have partly mitigated the population-wide rise in child and adolescent BMI, while socioeconomic transition or other factors could be relevant to changes in BP between generations. Explaining these trends will help identify early-life factors that may contribute to a healthier start as well as contemporaneous factors that may protect against rising trends in adiposity. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health-
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Copyright © BMJ Publishing Group.-
dc.subjectage-period-cohort-
dc.subjectblood pressure-
dc.subjectchild health-
dc.subjectobesity-
dc.titleAge–period–cohort analysis of trends in blood pressure and body mass index in children and adolescents in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKwok, MK: maggiek@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, MK=rp02051-
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech-2017-209491-
dc.identifier.pmid29056593-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85037054944-
dc.identifier.hkuros295493-
dc.identifier.volume71-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage1161-
dc.identifier.epage1167-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000414714100005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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