File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Significant chemical fluxes from natural terrestrial groundwater rival anthropogenic and fluvial input in a large-river deltaic estuary

TitleSignificant chemical fluxes from natural terrestrial groundwater rival anthropogenic and fluvial input in a large-river deltaic estuary
Authors
KeywordsAmmonium
Radium
Reactive transport model
Terrestrial groundwater discharge
The large river delta-front estuary (LDE) of Pearl River
Issue Date2018
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watres
Citation
Water Research, 2018, v. 144, p. 603-615 How to Cite?
AbstractThe shores of the Pearl River estuary are home to 35 million people. Their wastes are discharged into the large river delta-front estuary (LDE), one of the most highly polluted systems in the world. Here we construct a radium reactive transport model to estimate the terrestrial groundwater discharge (TGD) into the highly urbanized Pearl River LDE. We find the TGD comprises only approximately 0.9% in term of water discharge compared to the river discharge. The TGD in the Pearl River LDE delivers significant chemical fluxes to the coast, which are comparable to the fluvial loadings from Pearl River and other world major rivers. Of particular importance is the flux of ammonium because of its considerable role in Pearl River estuary eutrophication and hypoxia. Unlike the ammonium in many other aquifers, the ammonium in the Pearl River aquifer system is natural and originated from organic matter remineralization by sulfate reduction in the extremely reducing environment. The TGD derived NH4 + is as much as 5% of the upstream Pearl River fluvial loading and 42% of the anthropogenic inputs. This high groundwater NH4 + flux may greatly intensify the eutrophication, shift the trophic states, and lead to alarming hypoxia within the affected ecosystems in the Pearl River LDE. The large TGD derived chemical fluxes will lead to deterioration of water and will potentially affect human health. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/263363
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 7.051
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.772
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, X-
dc.contributor.authorJiao, JJJ-
dc.contributor.authorMoore, WS-
dc.contributor.authorCherry, JA-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, K-
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-22T07:37:44Z-
dc.date.available2018-10-22T07:37:44Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationWater Research, 2018, v. 144, p. 603-615-
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/263363-
dc.description.abstractThe shores of the Pearl River estuary are home to 35 million people. Their wastes are discharged into the large river delta-front estuary (LDE), one of the most highly polluted systems in the world. Here we construct a radium reactive transport model to estimate the terrestrial groundwater discharge (TGD) into the highly urbanized Pearl River LDE. We find the TGD comprises only approximately 0.9% in term of water discharge compared to the river discharge. The TGD in the Pearl River LDE delivers significant chemical fluxes to the coast, which are comparable to the fluvial loadings from Pearl River and other world major rivers. Of particular importance is the flux of ammonium because of its considerable role in Pearl River estuary eutrophication and hypoxia. Unlike the ammonium in many other aquifers, the ammonium in the Pearl River aquifer system is natural and originated from organic matter remineralization by sulfate reduction in the extremely reducing environment. The TGD derived NH4 + is as much as 5% of the upstream Pearl River fluvial loading and 42% of the anthropogenic inputs. This high groundwater NH4 + flux may greatly intensify the eutrophication, shift the trophic states, and lead to alarming hypoxia within the affected ecosystems in the Pearl River LDE. The large TGD derived chemical fluxes will lead to deterioration of water and will potentially affect human health. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/watres-
dc.relation.ispartofWater Research-
dc.subjectAmmonium-
dc.subjectRadium-
dc.subjectReactive transport model-
dc.subjectTerrestrial groundwater discharge-
dc.subjectThe large river delta-front estuary (LDE) of Pearl River-
dc.titleSignificant chemical fluxes from natural terrestrial groundwater rival anthropogenic and fluvial input in a large-river deltaic estuary-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLuo, X: xinluo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailJiao, JJJ: jjiao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJiao, JJJ=rp00712-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2018.07.004-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85051179097-
dc.identifier.hkuros294655-
dc.identifier.volume144-
dc.identifier.spage603-
dc.identifier.epage615-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000447569300059-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats