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Article: Children’s dental fear and anxiety: Exploring family related factors

TitleChildren’s dental fear and anxiety: Exploring family related factors
Authors
KeywordsChildren
Dental anxiety
Dental fear
Family factors
Parenting styles
Issue Date2018
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcoralhealth/
Citation
BMC Oral Health, 2018, v. 18 n. 1, article no. 100 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Dental fear and anxiety (DFA) is a major issue affecting children's oral health and clinical management. This study investigates the association between children's DFA and family related factors, including parents' DFA, parenting styles, family structure (nuclear or single-parent family), and presence of siblings. Methods: A total of 405 children (9-13 years old) and their parents were recruited from 3 elementary schools in Hong Kong. Child's demographic and family-related information was collected through a questionnaire. Parents' and child's DFA were measured by using the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (CDAS) and Children Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), respectively. Parenting styles were gauged by using the Parent Authority Questionnaire (PAQ). Results: DFA was reported by 33.1% of children. The mean (SD) CFSS-DS score was 29.1 (11.0). Children with siblings tended to report DFA (37.0% vs. 24.1%; p = 0.034) and had a higher CFSS-DS score (29.9 vs. 27.4; p = 0.025) as compared with their counterpart. Children from single-parent families had lower CFSS-DS score as compared with children from nuclear families (β = - 9.177; p = 0.029). Subgroup analysis showed a higher CFSS-DS score among boys with siblings (β = 7.130; p = 0.010) as compared with their counterpart; girls' from single-parent families had a lower CFSS-DS score (β = - 13.933; p = 0.015) as compared with girls from nuclear families. Children's DFA was not associated with parents' DFA or parenting styles (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Family structure (nuclear or single-parent family) and presence of siblings are significant determinants for children's DFA. Parental DFA and parenting style do not affect children's DFA significantly.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261342
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 1.911
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.616
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, L-
dc.contributor.authorGao, X-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-14T08:56:33Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-14T08:56:33Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Oral Health, 2018, v. 18 n. 1, article no. 100-
dc.identifier.issn1472-6831-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261342-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Dental fear and anxiety (DFA) is a major issue affecting children's oral health and clinical management. This study investigates the association between children's DFA and family related factors, including parents' DFA, parenting styles, family structure (nuclear or single-parent family), and presence of siblings. Methods: A total of 405 children (9-13 years old) and their parents were recruited from 3 elementary schools in Hong Kong. Child's demographic and family-related information was collected through a questionnaire. Parents' and child's DFA were measured by using the Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (CDAS) and Children Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), respectively. Parenting styles were gauged by using the Parent Authority Questionnaire (PAQ). Results: DFA was reported by 33.1% of children. The mean (SD) CFSS-DS score was 29.1 (11.0). Children with siblings tended to report DFA (37.0% vs. 24.1%; p = 0.034) and had a higher CFSS-DS score (29.9 vs. 27.4; p = 0.025) as compared with their counterpart. Children from single-parent families had lower CFSS-DS score as compared with children from nuclear families (β = - 9.177; p = 0.029). Subgroup analysis showed a higher CFSS-DS score among boys with siblings (β = 7.130; p = 0.010) as compared with their counterpart; girls' from single-parent families had a lower CFSS-DS score (β = - 13.933; p = 0.015) as compared with girls from nuclear families. Children's DFA was not associated with parents' DFA or parenting styles (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Family structure (nuclear or single-parent family) and presence of siblings are significant determinants for children's DFA. Parental DFA and parenting style do not affect children's DFA significantly.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcoralhealth/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Oral Health-
dc.rightsBMC Oral Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectChildren-
dc.subjectDental anxiety-
dc.subjectDental fear-
dc.subjectFamily factors-
dc.subjectParenting styles-
dc.titleChildren’s dental fear and anxiety: Exploring family related factors-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGao, X: gaoxl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGao, X=rp01509-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12903-018-0553-z-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85048042374-
dc.identifier.hkuros290014-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 100-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 100-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000434339200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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