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Book Chapter: The Civil Sphere in the Cultural and Political Transformations of Modern East Asia

TitleThe Civil Sphere in the Cultural and Political Transformations of Modern East Asia
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherCambridge University Press
Citation
The Civil Sphere in the Cultural and Political Transformations of Modern East Asia . In Jeffrey Alexander, David A. Palmer, Agnes Ku and Sunwoong Park (Eds.), The Civil Sphere in East Asia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018 How to Cite?
AbstractScholarship on civil society in East Asia has suffered from a weak theorization in which civil society is generally defined as voluntary organizations that exist in the “third sector” outside the state and private sector. Civil Sphere Theory (CST) aims to describe and explain the moral codes and institutional foundations of democratic solidarity, manifested within a distinct social sphere. This chapter explores the possibility and challenges of applying CST in East Asian contexts. We begin by discussing three general issues that need to be addressed in such an endeavor: (1) how the cultural codes of the civil sphere relate to traditional values and moral codes such as those of Confucian civility; (2) the role of East Asian developmental states and authoritarian regimes in the shaping and emergence of civil spheres; and (3) the relationship between civil spheres, associational civil society, and democratic transitions. We then take a macro-historical approach to trace the transformations of modern civil spheres in relation to the above-mentioned three structural factors, in each of the polities covered by the case studies in this book: Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261017

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, DA-
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, JC-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-14T08:51:04Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-14T08:51:04Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationThe Civil Sphere in the Cultural and Political Transformations of Modern East Asia . In Jeffrey Alexander, David A. Palmer, Agnes Ku and Sunwoong Park (Eds.), The Civil Sphere in East Asia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/261017-
dc.description.abstractScholarship on civil society in East Asia has suffered from a weak theorization in which civil society is generally defined as voluntary organizations that exist in the “third sector” outside the state and private sector. Civil Sphere Theory (CST) aims to describe and explain the moral codes and institutional foundations of democratic solidarity, manifested within a distinct social sphere. This chapter explores the possibility and challenges of applying CST in East Asian contexts. We begin by discussing three general issues that need to be addressed in such an endeavor: (1) how the cultural codes of the civil sphere relate to traditional values and moral codes such as those of Confucian civility; (2) the role of East Asian developmental states and authoritarian regimes in the shaping and emergence of civil spheres; and (3) the relationship between civil spheres, associational civil society, and democratic transitions. We then take a macro-historical approach to trace the transformations of modern civil spheres in relation to the above-mentioned three structural factors, in each of the polities covered by the case studies in this book: Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Civil Sphere in East Asia-
dc.titleThe Civil Sphere in the Cultural and Political Transformations of Modern East Asia -
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailPalmer, DA: palmer19@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPalmer, DA=rp00654-
dc.identifier.hkuros290958-
dc.publisher.placeCambridge-

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