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Article: Remoteness promotes biological invasions on islands worldwide

TitleRemoteness promotes biological invasions on islands worldwide
Authors
Keywordsisland biogeography
alien species
isolation
island invasibility
naturalization
Issue Date2018
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2018, p. 201804179 How to Cite?
AbstractOne of the best-known general patterns in island biogeography is the species–isolation relationship (SIR), a decrease in the number of native species with increasing island isolation that is linked to lower rates of natural dispersal and colonization on remote oceanic islands. However, during recent centuries, the anthropogenic introduction of alien species has increasingly gained importance and altered the composition and richness of island species pools. We analyzed a large dataset for alien and native plants, ants, reptiles, mammals, and birds on 257 (sub) tropical islands, and showed that, except for birds, the number of naturalized alien species increases with isolation for all taxa, a pattern that is opposite to the negative SIR of native species. We argue that the reversal of the SIR for alien species is driven by an increase in island invasibility due to reduced diversity and increased ecological naiveté of native biota on the more remote islands.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259950
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 9.504
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMoser, D-
dc.contributor.authorLenzner, B-
dc.contributor.authorWeigelt, P-
dc.contributor.authorDawson, W-
dc.contributor.authorKreft, H-
dc.contributor.authorPergl, J-
dc.contributor.authorPyšek, P-
dc.contributor.authorvan Kleunen, M-
dc.contributor.authorWinter, M-
dc.contributor.authorCapinha, C-
dc.contributor.authorCassey, P-
dc.contributor.authorDullinger, S-
dc.contributor.authorEconomo, EP-
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Díaz, P-
dc.contributor.authorGuenard, BS-
dc.contributor.authorHofhansl, F-
dc.contributor.authorMang, T-
dc.contributor.authorSeebens, H-
dc.contributor.authorEssl, F-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T04:21:08Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T04:21:08Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2018, p. 201804179-
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259950-
dc.description.abstractOne of the best-known general patterns in island biogeography is the species–isolation relationship (SIR), a decrease in the number of native species with increasing island isolation that is linked to lower rates of natural dispersal and colonization on remote oceanic islands. However, during recent centuries, the anthropogenic introduction of alien species has increasingly gained importance and altered the composition and richness of island species pools. We analyzed a large dataset for alien and native plants, ants, reptiles, mammals, and birds on 257 (sub) tropical islands, and showed that, except for birds, the number of naturalized alien species increases with isolation for all taxa, a pattern that is opposite to the negative SIR of native species. We argue that the reversal of the SIR for alien species is driven by an increase in island invasibility due to reduced diversity and increased ecological naiveté of native biota on the more remote islands.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences-
dc.rightsProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences.-
dc.subjectisland biogeography-
dc.subjectalien species-
dc.subjectisolation-
dc.subjectisland invasibility-
dc.subjectnaturalization-
dc.titleRemoteness promotes biological invasions on islands worldwide-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGuenard, BS: bguenard@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGuenard, BS=rp01963-
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1804179115-
dc.identifier.hkuros289708-
dc.identifier.spage201804179-
dc.identifier.epage201804179-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000444257200068-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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