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Article: Linking hydrological and bioecological benefits of green infrastructures across spatial scales – A literature review

TitleLinking hydrological and bioecological benefits of green infrastructures across spatial scales – A literature review
Authors
KeywordsGreen infrastructure
Stormwater management
Landscape ecology
Ecosystem services
Spatial analysis
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2019, v. 646, p. 1219-1231 How to Cite?
AbstractGreen infrastructure (GI) mitigates the negative effects of urbanization and provides hydrological and bioecological benefits. However, these benefits are highly scale-dependent because the processes involved vary at different spatial scales; there are thus additional challenges in GI planning when multiple benefits are targeted. Therefore, it is necessary to review and summarize the theoretical understandings and practical experience obtained from previous studies and projects related to the hydrological and bioecological benefits of GI practices. In this review, we elaborate the conceptual linkages between the hydrological and bioecological benefits of GI practices across different scales. Smaller-scale benefits lay the foundation for larger-scale benefits. Hydrological benefits drive bioecological benefits by providing consistent water flows and maintaining a suitable soil environment. Bioecological benefits in turn enhance hydrological benefits by increasing water uptake and filtration via more active biological processes. We next summarize the study area sizes of existing studies and categorize them according to their study approaches and targeted benefits. The study area sizes in studies that make use of laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and remote sensing have increased in recent years and vary greatly between each type of study; the study area size in studies of bioecological benefits was larger than in studies of hydrological and water quality benefits. However, there is a research gap in studies of bioecological benefits at the catchment scale. Furthermore, we summarize the major research topics and findings of bioecological benefits of GI practices at different spatial scales. We conclude this review with recommendations for future research, which include performing more studies at the catchment scale, developing hydro-bioecological statistical relationships to simplify the quantification of bioecological benefits, and developing databases to document the bioecological benefits of GI practices.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259211
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.61
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.702
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, K-
dc.contributor.authorChui, TFM-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T04:03:12Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T04:03:12Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationScience of the Total Environment, 2019, v. 646, p. 1219-1231-
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259211-
dc.description.abstractGreen infrastructure (GI) mitigates the negative effects of urbanization and provides hydrological and bioecological benefits. However, these benefits are highly scale-dependent because the processes involved vary at different spatial scales; there are thus additional challenges in GI planning when multiple benefits are targeted. Therefore, it is necessary to review and summarize the theoretical understandings and practical experience obtained from previous studies and projects related to the hydrological and bioecological benefits of GI practices. In this review, we elaborate the conceptual linkages between the hydrological and bioecological benefits of GI practices across different scales. Smaller-scale benefits lay the foundation for larger-scale benefits. Hydrological benefits drive bioecological benefits by providing consistent water flows and maintaining a suitable soil environment. Bioecological benefits in turn enhance hydrological benefits by increasing water uptake and filtration via more active biological processes. We next summarize the study area sizes of existing studies and categorize them according to their study approaches and targeted benefits. The study area sizes in studies that make use of laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and remote sensing have increased in recent years and vary greatly between each type of study; the study area size in studies of bioecological benefits was larger than in studies of hydrological and water quality benefits. However, there is a research gap in studies of bioecological benefits at the catchment scale. Furthermore, we summarize the major research topics and findings of bioecological benefits of GI practices at different spatial scales. We conclude this review with recommendations for future research, which include performing more studies at the catchment scale, developing hydro-bioecological statistical relationships to simplify the quantification of bioecological benefits, and developing databases to document the bioecological benefits of GI practices.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv-
dc.relation.ispartofScience of the Total Environment-
dc.subjectGreen infrastructure-
dc.subjectStormwater management-
dc.subjectLandscape ecology-
dc.subjectEcosystem services-
dc.subjectSpatial analysis-
dc.titleLinking hydrological and bioecological benefits of green infrastructures across spatial scales – A literature review-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChui, TFM: maychui@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChui, TFM=rp01696-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.07.355-
dc.identifier.pmid30235608-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85050769088-
dc.identifier.hkuros289220-
dc.identifier.volume646-
dc.identifier.spage1219-
dc.identifier.epage1231-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000445164800119-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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