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Article: Eveningness chronotype, insomnia symptoms, and emotional and behavioural problems in adolescents

TitleEveningness chronotype, insomnia symptoms, and emotional and behavioural problems in adolescents
Authors
Issue Date2018
Citation
Sleep Medicine, 2018, v. 47, p. 93-99 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Eveningness tendency and insomnia are common in adolescents, but whether they have an independent or synergistic effect on the risk of psychopathology have remained undefined. The present study aimed to examine eveningness chronotype and insomnia symptoms in relation to mental health and emotional and behavioural problems in a community-based adolescent population. METHODS: A total of 4948 adolescents (weighted mean age: 14.5 ± 1.8 years, weighted percentage of females: 48.9%) completed the measures. Insomnia was assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and chronotype preference was measured by the reduced version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). Emotional and behavioural problems and mental health were assessed by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), respectively. Potential confounders including demographic factors, pubertal status, general health, and sleep duration were controlled for in the analyses. RESULTS: Insomnia symptoms were prevalent in evening-type adolescents (52% vs intermediate-type: 34.3%, morning-type: 18.0%, p < 0.001), especially two subtypes of insomnia symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep and difficulty maintaining sleep. Eveningness and insomnia were independently associated with an increased risk of having emotional and behavioural problems (eveningness: adjusted odds ratio [AdjOR] = 1.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61-2.19, p < 0.001; insomnia: AdjOR = 3.66, 95% CI = 2.73-4.91) as well as poor mental health in adolescents (eveningness: AdjOR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04-1.52, p < 0.001; insomnia: AdjOR = 3.63, 95% CI = 2.41-5.03). CONCLUSIONS: Eveningness and insomnia symptoms are independently associated with the risk of psychopathology in adolescents. Our findings underscore the need to address both sleep and circadian factors in assessing and managing emotional and behavioural problems in the adolescent population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259107

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, XS-
dc.contributor.authorCHAN, NY-
dc.contributor.authorYu, MWM-
dc.contributor.authorLam, SP-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, J-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WYJ-
dc.contributor.authorLi, AM-
dc.contributor.authorWing, YK-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T04:01:36Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T04:01:36Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationSleep Medicine, 2018, v. 47, p. 93-99-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/259107-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Eveningness tendency and insomnia are common in adolescents, but whether they have an independent or synergistic effect on the risk of psychopathology have remained undefined. The present study aimed to examine eveningness chronotype and insomnia symptoms in relation to mental health and emotional and behavioural problems in a community-based adolescent population. METHODS: A total of 4948 adolescents (weighted mean age: 14.5 ± 1.8 years, weighted percentage of females: 48.9%) completed the measures. Insomnia was assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and chronotype preference was measured by the reduced version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). Emotional and behavioural problems and mental health were assessed by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), respectively. Potential confounders including demographic factors, pubertal status, general health, and sleep duration were controlled for in the analyses. RESULTS: Insomnia symptoms were prevalent in evening-type adolescents (52% vs intermediate-type: 34.3%, morning-type: 18.0%, p < 0.001), especially two subtypes of insomnia symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep and difficulty maintaining sleep. Eveningness and insomnia were independently associated with an increased risk of having emotional and behavioural problems (eveningness: adjusted odds ratio [AdjOR] = 1.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61-2.19, p < 0.001; insomnia: AdjOR = 3.66, 95% CI = 2.73-4.91) as well as poor mental health in adolescents (eveningness: AdjOR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04-1.52, p < 0.001; insomnia: AdjOR = 3.63, 95% CI = 2.41-5.03). CONCLUSIONS: Eveningness and insomnia symptoms are independently associated with the risk of psychopathology in adolescents. Our findings underscore the need to address both sleep and circadian factors in assessing and managing emotional and behavioural problems in the adolescent population.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSleep Medicine-
dc.titleEveningness chronotype, insomnia symptoms, and emotional and behavioural problems in adolescents-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLi, XS: shirleyx@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, XS=rp02114-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.sleep.2018.03.025-
dc.identifier.hkuros288030-
dc.identifier.volume47-
dc.identifier.spage93-
dc.identifier.epage99-

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