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Article: A Brief Body-Mind-Spirit Group Therapy for Chinese Medicine Stagnation Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

TitleA Brief Body-Mind-Spirit Group Therapy for Chinese Medicine Stagnation Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/
Citation
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2018, v. 2018, p. 8153637:1-8153637:12 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Stagnation syndrome, a diagnostic entity in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), is characterized by mind-body obstruction-like symptoms. Although TCM has long-established symptom-relief treatments, a comprehensive mind-body intervention was called for. Purpose The study evaluated the efficacy of a six-session body-mind-spirit (BMS) group therapy for persons with stagnation syndrome. Method A 2-arm randomized controlled trial design was adopted. The control group received a parallel general TCM instruction course. Both groups completed a pretest (T0), posttest (T1), and 2-month follow-up assessment (T2). The measures included self-report scales on stagnation, depression, anxiety, physical distress, daily functioning, and positive and negative affect; the other measure was of salivary cortisol, a biological marker of stress. Results Data on 111 adults with stagnation syndrome were included in the analysis. Completion rates were high (over 87%) for both the intervention and control groups. Repeated measures multivariate MANOVA revealed a significant combined effect with large effect size (eta-squared = 0.42). Repeated measures ANOVA further revealed that the intervention group showed significant improvements in stagnation, the primary outcome, with medium effect size (eta-squared = 0.11). The intervention group also showed significant improvements in depression, physical distress, everyday functioning and negative affect (eta-squared = 0.06 to 0.13). Post hoc analysis revealed that the intervention group showed significant improvements over the control group in cortisol level at 2-month follow-up assessment (T0 vs T2) with small effect size (eta-squared = 0.05), but not at posttest (T0 vs T1). Conclusions Overall, the findings indicate that our brief BMS group therapy intervention for stagnation syndrome is efficacious. Moreover, the intervention resulted in a number of substantial improvements in the physical and mental health domains.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258719
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.064
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.615
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, SM-
dc.contributor.authorLENG, L-
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTH-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Z-
dc.contributor.authorWANG, Q-
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T01:42:58Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-22T01:42:58Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationEvidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2018, v. 2018, p. 8153637:1-8153637:12-
dc.identifier.issn1741-427X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258719-
dc.description.abstractBackground Stagnation syndrome, a diagnostic entity in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), is characterized by mind-body obstruction-like symptoms. Although TCM has long-established symptom-relief treatments, a comprehensive mind-body intervention was called for. Purpose The study evaluated the efficacy of a six-session body-mind-spirit (BMS) group therapy for persons with stagnation syndrome. Method A 2-arm randomized controlled trial design was adopted. The control group received a parallel general TCM instruction course. Both groups completed a pretest (T0), posttest (T1), and 2-month follow-up assessment (T2). The measures included self-report scales on stagnation, depression, anxiety, physical distress, daily functioning, and positive and negative affect; the other measure was of salivary cortisol, a biological marker of stress. Results Data on 111 adults with stagnation syndrome were included in the analysis. Completion rates were high (over 87%) for both the intervention and control groups. Repeated measures multivariate MANOVA revealed a significant combined effect with large effect size (eta-squared = 0.42). Repeated measures ANOVA further revealed that the intervention group showed significant improvements in stagnation, the primary outcome, with medium effect size (eta-squared = 0.11). The intervention group also showed significant improvements in depression, physical distress, everyday functioning and negative affect (eta-squared = 0.06 to 0.13). Post hoc analysis revealed that the intervention group showed significant improvements over the control group in cortisol level at 2-month follow-up assessment (T0 vs T2) with small effect size (eta-squared = 0.05), but not at posttest (T0 vs T1). Conclusions Overall, the findings indicate that our brief BMS group therapy intervention for stagnation syndrome is efficacious. Moreover, the intervention resulted in a number of substantial improvements in the physical and mental health domains.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/-
dc.relation.ispartofEvidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleA Brief Body-Mind-Spirit Group Therapy for Chinese Medicine Stagnation Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, Z: zhangzj@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, Z=rp01297-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2018/8153637-
dc.identifier.hkuros286543-
dc.identifier.volume2018-
dc.identifier.spage8153637:1-
dc.identifier.epage8153637:12-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000436292100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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