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Conference Paper: Semiconductor plasmon laser

TitleSemiconductor plasmon laser
Authors
KeywordsOptical confinement
Laser
Surface plasmon
Sub-wavelength
Semiconductor
Purcell effect
Issue Date2010
Citation
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2010, v. 7757 How to Cite?
AbstractLaser science has tackled physical limitations to achieve higher power, faster and smaller light sources1-9. The quest for ultra-compact laser that can directly generate coherent optical fields at the nano-scale, far beyond the diffraction limit of light, remains a key fundamental challenge10,11. Microscopic lasers based on photonic crystals3, metal clad cavities4and nanowires5-7can now reach the diffraction limit, which restricts both the optical mode size and physical device dimension to be larger than half a wavelength. While surface plasmons12,13are capable of tightly localizing light, ohmic loss at optical frequencies has inhibited the realization of truly nano-scale lasers14,15. Recent theory has proposed a way to significantly reduce plasmonic loss while maintaining ultra-small modes by using a hybrid plasmonic waveguide16. Using this approach, we report an experimental demonstration of nano-scale plasmonic lasers producing optical modes 100 times smaller than the diffraction limit, utilizing a high gain Cadmium Sulphide semiconductor nanowire atop a Silver surface separated by a 5 nm thick insulating gap. Direct measurements of emission lifetime reveal a broad-band enhancement of the nanowire's exciton spontaneous emission rate up to 6 times due to the strong mode confinement17and the signature of apparently threshold-less lasing. Since plasmonic modes have no cut-off, we show down-scaling of the lateral dimensions of both device and optical mode. As these optical coherent sources approach molecular and electronics length scales, plasmonic lasers offer the possibility to explore extreme interactions between light and matter, opening new avenues in active photonic circuits18, bio-sensing19and quantum information technology20. © 2010 SPIE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/257061
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSorger, Volker J.-
dc.contributor.authorOulton, Rupert F.-
dc.contributor.authorZentgraf, Thomas-
dc.contributor.authorMa, Renmin-
dc.contributor.authorGladden, Christopher-
dc.contributor.authorDai, Lun-
dc.contributor.authorBartal, Guy-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xiang-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-24T08:58:43Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-24T08:58:43Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2010, v. 7757-
dc.identifier.issn0277-786X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/257061-
dc.description.abstractLaser science has tackled physical limitations to achieve higher power, faster and smaller light sources1-9. The quest for ultra-compact laser that can directly generate coherent optical fields at the nano-scale, far beyond the diffraction limit of light, remains a key fundamental challenge10,11. Microscopic lasers based on photonic crystals3, metal clad cavities4and nanowires5-7can now reach the diffraction limit, which restricts both the optical mode size and physical device dimension to be larger than half a wavelength. While surface plasmons12,13are capable of tightly localizing light, ohmic loss at optical frequencies has inhibited the realization of truly nano-scale lasers14,15. Recent theory has proposed a way to significantly reduce plasmonic loss while maintaining ultra-small modes by using a hybrid plasmonic waveguide16. Using this approach, we report an experimental demonstration of nano-scale plasmonic lasers producing optical modes 100 times smaller than the diffraction limit, utilizing a high gain Cadmium Sulphide semiconductor nanowire atop a Silver surface separated by a 5 nm thick insulating gap. Direct measurements of emission lifetime reveal a broad-band enhancement of the nanowire's exciton spontaneous emission rate up to 6 times due to the strong mode confinement17and the signature of apparently threshold-less lasing. Since plasmonic modes have no cut-off, we show down-scaling of the lateral dimensions of both device and optical mode. As these optical coherent sources approach molecular and electronics length scales, plasmonic lasers offer the possibility to explore extreme interactions between light and matter, opening new avenues in active photonic circuits18, bio-sensing19and quantum information technology20. © 2010 SPIE.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering-
dc.subjectOptical confinement-
dc.subjectLaser-
dc.subjectSurface plasmon-
dc.subjectSub-wavelength-
dc.subjectSemiconductor-
dc.subjectPurcell effect-
dc.titleSemiconductor plasmon laser-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.859136-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952692527-
dc.identifier.volume7757-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-

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