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Article: Incidence of influenza A(H3N2) virus infections in Hong Kong in a longitudinal sero-epidemiological study, 2009-2015

TitleIncidence of influenza A(H3N2) virus infections in Hong Kong in a longitudinal sero-epidemiological study, 2009-2015
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS One, 2018, v. 13 n. 5, p. e0197504 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Many serologic studies were done during and after the 2009 influenza pandemic, to estimate the cumulative incidence of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, but there are few comparative estimates of the incidence of influenza A(H3N2) virus infections during epidemics. Methods We conducted a longitudinal serologic study in Hong Kong. We collected sera annually and tested samples from 2009–13 by HAI against the A/Perth/16/2009(H3N2) virus, and samples from 2013–15 against the A/Victoria/361/2011(H3N2) virus using the hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay. We estimated the cumulative incidence of infections based on 4-fold or greater rises in HAI titers in consecutive sera. Results There were four major H3N2 epidemics: (1) Aug-Oct 2010; (2) Mar-Jun 2012; (3) Jul-Oct 2013; and (4) Jun-Jul 2014. Between 516 and 619 relevant pairs of sera were available for each epidemic. We estimated that 9%, 19%, 7% and 7% of the population were infected in each epidemic, respectively, with higher incidence in children in epidemics 1 and 4. Conclusions We found that re-infections in each of the four H3N2 epidemics that occurred from 2010 through 2014 were rare. The largest H3N2 epidemic occurred with the lowest level of pre-epidemic immunity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256175
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.766
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWei, WI-
dc.contributor.authorWong, YT-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, KO-
dc.contributor.authorFang, J-
dc.contributor.authorBarr, IG-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorRiley, S-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-20T06:30:24Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-20T06:30:24Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2018, v. 13 n. 5, p. e0197504-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/256175-
dc.description.abstractBackground Many serologic studies were done during and after the 2009 influenza pandemic, to estimate the cumulative incidence of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, but there are few comparative estimates of the incidence of influenza A(H3N2) virus infections during epidemics. Methods We conducted a longitudinal serologic study in Hong Kong. We collected sera annually and tested samples from 2009–13 by HAI against the A/Perth/16/2009(H3N2) virus, and samples from 2013–15 against the A/Victoria/361/2011(H3N2) virus using the hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay. We estimated the cumulative incidence of infections based on 4-fold or greater rises in HAI titers in consecutive sera. Results There were four major H3N2 epidemics: (1) Aug-Oct 2010; (2) Mar-Jun 2012; (3) Jul-Oct 2013; and (4) Jun-Jul 2014. Between 516 and 619 relevant pairs of sera were available for each epidemic. We estimated that 9%, 19%, 7% and 7% of the population were infected in each epidemic, respectively, with higher incidence in children in epidemics 1 and 4. Conclusions We found that re-infections in each of the four H3N2 epidemics that occurred from 2010 through 2014 were rare. The largest H3N2 epidemic occurred with the lowest level of pre-epidemic immunity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS One-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleIncidence of influenza A(H3N2) virus infections in Hong Kong in a longitudinal sero-epidemiological study, 2009-2015-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, YT: wongytj@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPerera, RAPM: mahenp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFang, J: vickyf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailRiley, S: sriley@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPerera, RAPM=rp02500-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.identifier.authorityRiley, S=rp00511-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0197504-
dc.identifier.pmid29795587-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85047493720-
dc.identifier.hkuros285992-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spagee0197504-
dc.identifier.epagee0197504-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000433084300045-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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