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Conference Paper: Trust: a missing ingredient in curriculum and assessment reform?

TitleTrust: a missing ingredient in curriculum and assessment reform?
Authors
Issue Date2012
Citation
General Education and University Curriculum Reform Conference, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 12-14 June 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractTrust has long been recognized as an important issue in various fields, including economics, political science, sociology and organizational theory. Trust or distrust is also central to reform or conservatism in relation to assessment processes which lie at the heart of attempts to reform the curriculum. Principled assessment for the new curriculum in Hong Kong requires three interrelated components: assessment task design which promotes the desired attributes of the curriculum; participative assessment in which students engage with criteria and the work of their peers; and sustainable feedback in which students come to rely more on their own self-evaluative capacities and less on the advice of a tutor. I apply the notions of trust and distrust to these elements by exploring the following questions. To what extent are innovative assessments trusted and is conservatism in assessment much of the reason for the dominance of essays and examinations? To what extent do teachers trust students to take responsibility for their own learning; selfevaluate themselves appropriately; and provide constructive critique of the work of peers? To what extent do trusting relationships facilitate a dialogic feedback process? Some suggestions for enhancing trust are proposed, including an open, trusting and dialogic approach to teaching.
DescriptionTheme 9: Assessment of GE Programmes
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/255296

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCarless, David-
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-04T01:56:04Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-04T01:56:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationGeneral Education and University Curriculum Reform Conference, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 12-14 June 2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/255296-
dc.descriptionTheme 9: Assessment of GE Programmes-
dc.description.abstractTrust has long been recognized as an important issue in various fields, including economics, political science, sociology and organizational theory. Trust or distrust is also central to reform or conservatism in relation to assessment processes which lie at the heart of attempts to reform the curriculum. Principled assessment for the new curriculum in Hong Kong requires three interrelated components: assessment task design which promotes the desired attributes of the curriculum; participative assessment in which students engage with criteria and the work of their peers; and sustainable feedback in which students come to rely more on their own self-evaluative capacities and less on the advice of a tutor. I apply the notions of trust and distrust to these elements by exploring the following questions. To what extent are innovative assessments trusted and is conservatism in assessment much of the reason for the dominance of essays and examinations? To what extent do teachers trust students to take responsibility for their own learning; selfevaluate themselves appropriately; and provide constructive critique of the work of peers? To what extent do trusting relationships facilitate a dialogic feedback process? Some suggestions for enhancing trust are proposed, including an open, trusting and dialogic approach to teaching.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofGeneral Education and University Curriculum Reform Conference-
dc.titleTrust: a missing ingredient in curriculum and assessment reform?-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailCarless, David: dcarless@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCarless, David=rp00889-
dc.identifier.hkuros202307-
dc.publisher.placeChina-

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