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Article: The role of cognitive bias in relation to persistent distress among women diagnosed with breast cancer

TitleThe role of cognitive bias in relation to persistent distress among women diagnosed with breast cancer
Authors
Keywordsattention bias
breast cancer
chronic distress
cogntivie bias
interpretation bias
Issue Date2018
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2018, v. 27 n. 3, p. 983-989 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine if bias in attention to and interpretation of cancer‐related stimuli differentiates women with persistent psychological distress from those with low/transient distress following breast cancer. Methods: One‐hundred forty women classified in a prior longitudinal study as having low (n = 73) or persistent high (n = 67) distress completed 2 modified dot‐probe tasks assessing attention bias and an ambiguous cues task assessing interpretation bias toward cancer‐related vs neutral information. Psychological distress was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale. Four‐way repeated analysis of variance was adopted. Results: Participants with persistent high distress from the original study who continued to report high Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale scores (≥8) on recruitment into the present study comprised the persistent distress group (ie, 31 reporting high anxiety and 30 reporting high depression scores). Persistent distress and low distress groups did not differ in attentional bias toward negative‐stimuli or cancer‐related information, but a significant time‐course effect in attentional bias toward negative‐stimuli or cancer‐related information was observed, with women in the persistent distress group showing a significant bias away from negative‐stimuli or cancer‐related information under supraliminal conditions. There was a borderline difference in interpretation bias scores between low anxiety and chronic anxiety groups (P = .065), with correlation suggesting a significant positive association (r = 0.20, P = .019). Conclusion: Women with persistent distress may adopt avoidance strategies to cope with breast cancer. Moreover, women reporting persistent anxiety may have a tendency to negatively interpret ambiguous information, leading to illness preoccupation. These findings offer critical insight for clinicians to develop tailored interventions to help women with persistent psychological distress.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251747
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.455
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWT-
dc.contributor.authorNg, D-
dc.contributor.authorWong, S-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMC-
dc.contributor.authorKwong, A-
dc.contributor.authorFielding, R-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-19T07:00:32Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-19T07:00:32Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2018, v. 27 n. 3, p. 983-989-
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251747-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine if bias in attention to and interpretation of cancer‐related stimuli differentiates women with persistent psychological distress from those with low/transient distress following breast cancer. Methods: One‐hundred forty women classified in a prior longitudinal study as having low (n = 73) or persistent high (n = 67) distress completed 2 modified dot‐probe tasks assessing attention bias and an ambiguous cues task assessing interpretation bias toward cancer‐related vs neutral information. Psychological distress was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale. Four‐way repeated analysis of variance was adopted. Results: Participants with persistent high distress from the original study who continued to report high Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale scores (≥8) on recruitment into the present study comprised the persistent distress group (ie, 31 reporting high anxiety and 30 reporting high depression scores). Persistent distress and low distress groups did not differ in attentional bias toward negative‐stimuli or cancer‐related information, but a significant time‐course effect in attentional bias toward negative‐stimuli or cancer‐related information was observed, with women in the persistent distress group showing a significant bias away from negative‐stimuli or cancer‐related information under supraliminal conditions. There was a borderline difference in interpretation bias scores between low anxiety and chronic anxiety groups (P = .065), with correlation suggesting a significant positive association (r = 0.20, P = .019). Conclusion: Women with persistent distress may adopt avoidance strategies to cope with breast cancer. Moreover, women reporting persistent anxiety may have a tendency to negatively interpret ambiguous information, leading to illness preoccupation. These findings offer critical insight for clinicians to develop tailored interventions to help women with persistent psychological distress.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncology-
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.rightsPreprint: This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. Postprint: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. Special Statement for Preprint only Before publication: 'This is a preprint of an article accepted for publication in [The Journal of Pathology] Copyright © ([year]) ([Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland])'. After publication: the preprint notice should be amended to follows: 'This is a preprint of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Contribution as published in the print edition of the Journal]' For Cochrane Library/ Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, add statement & acknowledgement : ‘This review is published as a Cochrane Review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 20XX, Issue X. Cochrane Reviews are regularly updated as new evidence emerges and in response to comments and criticisms, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews should be consulted for the most recent version of the Review.’ Please include reference to the Review and hyperlink to the original version using the following format e.g. Authors. Title of Review. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 20XX, Issue #. Art. No.: CD00XXXX. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD00XXXX (insert persistent link to the article by using the URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD00XXXX) (This statement should refer to the most recent issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in which the Review published.)-
dc.subjectattention bias-
dc.subjectbreast cancer-
dc.subjectchronic distress-
dc.subjectcogntivie bias-
dc.subjectinterpretation bias-
dc.titleThe role of cognitive bias in relation to persistent distress among women diagnosed with breast cancer-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKwong, A: avakwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443-
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, A=rp01734-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.4620-
dc.identifier.pmid29274295-
dc.identifier.hkuros284567-
dc.identifier.volume27-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage983-
dc.identifier.epage989-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000426747700034-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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