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Article: Staying motivated to e-learn: Person- and variable-centred perspectives on the longitudinal risks and support

TitleStaying motivated to e-learn: Person- and variable-centred perspectives on the longitudinal risks and support
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/compedu
Citation
Computers & Education, 2018, v. 120, p. 227-240 How to Cite?
AbstractPersistence in any of the growing variety of e-learning formats is a longstanding and pernicious problem. The widely acknowledged nature of this issue makes the considerable gap in our understanding of students’ motivation to e-learn a serious concern. Building on initial studies, the current research examines important predictors and outcomes of students’ motivation for weekly review and extension e-learning experiences within a blended course. The present study aimed to simultaneously provide variable and person-centred longitudinal perspectives on students’ motivations to e-learn, thereby illustrating the potential outcomes of these experiences and indicating how they might be better structured and supported. Japanese students (n=642) studying in a blended course of foreign language study (two classes a week, with weekly online review and extension activities) completed surveys at three time points across an academic semester of study. Prior language competency and final e-learning completion were also included in modelling. Variable-centred results highlighted the essential role of teachers in supporting students’ ability, value and effort related motivations for studying online. All three motivations played an important role in predicting e-learning completion. Person-centred results tracking student movement between latent subgroups confirmed the importance of teachers, but also indicated a prior competence threshold below which teacher efforts alone might be insufficient to support substantive motivation for e-learning, and thereby, e-learning completion. The theoretical and practical implications of the present study’s findings regarding teacher-support and initial content competence are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251534
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.538
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.143
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFryer, LK-
dc.contributor.authorBovee, HN-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-01T03:40:48Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-01T03:40:48Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationComputers & Education, 2018, v. 120, p. 227-240-
dc.identifier.issn0360-1315-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251534-
dc.description.abstractPersistence in any of the growing variety of e-learning formats is a longstanding and pernicious problem. The widely acknowledged nature of this issue makes the considerable gap in our understanding of students’ motivation to e-learn a serious concern. Building on initial studies, the current research examines important predictors and outcomes of students’ motivation for weekly review and extension e-learning experiences within a blended course. The present study aimed to simultaneously provide variable and person-centred longitudinal perspectives on students’ motivations to e-learn, thereby illustrating the potential outcomes of these experiences and indicating how they might be better structured and supported. Japanese students (n=642) studying in a blended course of foreign language study (two classes a week, with weekly online review and extension activities) completed surveys at three time points across an academic semester of study. Prior language competency and final e-learning completion were also included in modelling. Variable-centred results highlighted the essential role of teachers in supporting students’ ability, value and effort related motivations for studying online. All three motivations played an important role in predicting e-learning completion. Person-centred results tracking student movement between latent subgroups confirmed the importance of teachers, but also indicated a prior competence threshold below which teacher efforts alone might be insufficient to support substantive motivation for e-learning, and thereby, e-learning completion. The theoretical and practical implications of the present study’s findings regarding teacher-support and initial content competence are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/compedu-
dc.relation.ispartofComputers & Education-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.titleStaying motivated to e-learn: Person- and variable-centred perspectives on the longitudinal risks and support-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailFryer, LK: fryer@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFryer, LK=rp02148-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.compedu.2018.01.006-
dc.identifier.hkuros284171-
dc.identifier.volume120-
dc.identifier.spage227-
dc.identifier.epage240-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000428002300017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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