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postgraduate thesis: Green belt, grey belt? : non-zoned approaches to landscape evaluation and management in Hong Kong

TitleGreen belt, grey belt? : non-zoned approaches to landscape evaluation and management in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Li, M. [李旻羲]. (2017). Green belt, grey belt? : non-zoned approaches to landscape evaluation and management in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThis thesis challenges the zone-based planning and evaluation systems for Hong Kong’s landscapes. Existing Country Park designations, Green Belt, and various conservation-related zones conserve Hong Kong’s natural landscapes and resources. However, these designations, especially the more ambiguous Green Belt, are weakly defined and susceptible to ever-increasing development pressures. Examining commonalities and differences across 6 sample sites, which are representative of the diverse development threats and range of zoning scenarios typical of Hong Kong’s buffer areas, it provides insight into the current disadvantages of zoned approaches. New methods of land categorization are needed to increase the resiliency and manageability of Hong Kong’s valuable natural areas. Using the controversial planned development of North Lantau Island as design test site, a more flexible yet less ambiguous approach is proposed to evaluate ecologically sensitive landscapes. Because scale and fineness of application was a major flaw in previous landscape in Hong Kong, including in the Metroplan (1989), Urbis’s Landscape Value Mapping of Hong Kong (2005), and annual Land Utilization Maps by the Planning Department, a trans-scalar approach is taken that is applicable at both a district scale (3000 sqm) as well as a neighbourhood level (400 sqm). The landscape gradient model recently advocated in landscape ecology (McGarigal, A. Cushman. University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 2005) suggests an alternative approach to landscape valuation than zoneor patch-based models. However, gradient models have been difficult to apply to smallscale sites. Using design or iterative methods, four aphysical value metrics are used in developing a new approach, including: 1) Conservation value (or intended value); 2) Ecological value; 3) Redevelopment/rezoning susceptibility (risk or threat value); and 4) Manageability (enforcement or strictness value). From this, two landscape management programs are proposed including: 1) a productive landscape which encourages social and economic growth that is mutually benefiting the environment and villagers; and 2) a conservation landscape which conserves and restores the ecological legacies and its intactness. Each program views the rural landscape as a dynamic system, as opposed to the existing zoned-approach that uses Green Belt and Conservation Area zones as static or closed. Such a gradient approach can allow or facilitate social and ecological value transfer into adjacent urban and natural areas.
DegreeMaster of Landscape Architecture
SubjectPlanning - Hong Kong - China - Greenbelts
China - Landscape architecture - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramArchitecture
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/249922

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Man-hei-
dc.contributor.author李旻羲-
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-19T09:27:46Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-19T09:27:46Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationLi, M. [李旻羲]. (2017). Green belt, grey belt? : non-zoned approaches to landscape evaluation and management in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/249922-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis challenges the zone-based planning and evaluation systems for Hong Kong’s landscapes. Existing Country Park designations, Green Belt, and various conservation-related zones conserve Hong Kong’s natural landscapes and resources. However, these designations, especially the more ambiguous Green Belt, are weakly defined and susceptible to ever-increasing development pressures. Examining commonalities and differences across 6 sample sites, which are representative of the diverse development threats and range of zoning scenarios typical of Hong Kong’s buffer areas, it provides insight into the current disadvantages of zoned approaches. New methods of land categorization are needed to increase the resiliency and manageability of Hong Kong’s valuable natural areas. Using the controversial planned development of North Lantau Island as design test site, a more flexible yet less ambiguous approach is proposed to evaluate ecologically sensitive landscapes. Because scale and fineness of application was a major flaw in previous landscape in Hong Kong, including in the Metroplan (1989), Urbis’s Landscape Value Mapping of Hong Kong (2005), and annual Land Utilization Maps by the Planning Department, a trans-scalar approach is taken that is applicable at both a district scale (3000 sqm) as well as a neighbourhood level (400 sqm). The landscape gradient model recently advocated in landscape ecology (McGarigal, A. Cushman. University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 2005) suggests an alternative approach to landscape valuation than zoneor patch-based models. However, gradient models have been difficult to apply to smallscale sites. Using design or iterative methods, four aphysical value metrics are used in developing a new approach, including: 1) Conservation value (or intended value); 2) Ecological value; 3) Redevelopment/rezoning susceptibility (risk or threat value); and 4) Manageability (enforcement or strictness value). From this, two landscape management programs are proposed including: 1) a productive landscape which encourages social and economic growth that is mutually benefiting the environment and villagers; and 2) a conservation landscape which conserves and restores the ecological legacies and its intactness. Each program views the rural landscape as a dynamic system, as opposed to the existing zoned-approach that uses Green Belt and Conservation Area zones as static or closed. Such a gradient approach can allow or facilitate social and ecological value transfer into adjacent urban and natural areas. -
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshPlanning - Hong Kong - China - Greenbelts-
dc.subject.lcshChina - Landscape architecture - Hong Kong-
dc.titleGreen belt, grey belt? : non-zoned approaches to landscape evaluation and management in Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Landscape Architecture-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineArchitecture-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2017-
dc.identifier.mmsid991043959697303414-

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