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Article: Molecular profiling of patients with advanced colorectal cancer: Princess Margaret Cancer Centre experience

TitleMolecular profiling of patients with advanced colorectal cancer: Princess Margaret Cancer Centre experience
Authors
KeywordsBRAF
Genomic profiling
KRAS
Mutation
Right colon cancer
Issue Date2018
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinical-colorectal-cancer.com
Citation
Clinical Colorectal Cancer, 2018, v. 17 n. 1, p. 73-79 How to Cite?
AbstractPatients with advanced colorectal were enrolled in a molecular profiling program. Of 245 patients, at least one mutation was found in 64.5% patients, with TP53, RAS, APC and PIK3CA being the most common mutations. Right colon cancers harbor more molecular aberrations than left colon or rectal cancers. This difference may contribute to differential outcomes to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. Background: Molecular aberrations in KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA have been well-described in advanced colorectal cancer. The incidences of other mutations are less known. We report results of molecular profiling of advanced colorectal cancer in an academic cancer center. Patients and Methods: Patients with advanced colorectal were enrolled in an institution-wide molecular profiling program. Profiling was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded archival tissues using a customized MassArray panel (23 genes, 279 mutations) or the Illumina MiSeq TruSeq Cancer Panel (48 genes, 212 amplicons, ≥ 500× coverage) in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratory. PTEN was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: From March 2012 to April 2014, 245 patients were enrolled. At least one mutation was found in 54% (97/178) and 91% (61/67) of patients using MassArray or MiSeq platforms, respectively (P <.01). Of all patients, KRAS G12/13 mutation was identified in 39%, and non-G12/13 KRAS, BRAF, or NRAS mutations were present in 9%, 6%, and 4%, respectively. Other common mutations included TP53 (68.7%), APC (41.8%), and PIK3CA (13.5%). Co-mutation with KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF was found in 75% of patients with PIK3CA mutation. Of 106 patients with known PTEN immunohistochemistry status, 16% were negative. A higher average number of mutations were observed in right versus left colorectal cancer (P <.01), with 13 of 14 BRAF mutations located in right colon cancer. Conclusion: Mutations are common in advanced colorectal cancer. Right colon cancers harbor more genetic aberrations than left colon or rectal cancers. These aberrations may contribute to differential outcomes to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy among patients with right colon, left colon, or rectal cancers. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/249666
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.861
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, WYJ-
dc.contributor.authorKrzyzanowska, MK-
dc.contributor.authorSerra, S-
dc.contributor.authorKnox, JJ-
dc.contributor.authorDhani, NC-
dc.contributor.authorMackay, H-
dc.contributor.authorHedley, D-
dc.contributor.authorMoore, M-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, G-
dc.contributor.authorBurkes, RL-
dc.contributor.authorBrezden-Masley, C-
dc.contributor.authorRoehrl, MH-
dc.contributor.authorCraddock, KJ-
dc.contributor.authorTsao, M-S-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T-
dc.contributor.authorYu, C-
dc.contributor.authorKamel-Reid, S-
dc.contributor.authorSiu, LL-
dc.contributor.authorBedard, PL-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EX-
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-21T03:05:19Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-21T03:05:19Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Colorectal Cancer, 2018, v. 17 n. 1, p. 73-79-
dc.identifier.issn1533-0028-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/249666-
dc.description.abstractPatients with advanced colorectal were enrolled in a molecular profiling program. Of 245 patients, at least one mutation was found in 64.5% patients, with TP53, RAS, APC and PIK3CA being the most common mutations. Right colon cancers harbor more molecular aberrations than left colon or rectal cancers. This difference may contribute to differential outcomes to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy. Background: Molecular aberrations in KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA have been well-described in advanced colorectal cancer. The incidences of other mutations are less known. We report results of molecular profiling of advanced colorectal cancer in an academic cancer center. Patients and Methods: Patients with advanced colorectal were enrolled in an institution-wide molecular profiling program. Profiling was performed on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded archival tissues using a customized MassArray panel (23 genes, 279 mutations) or the Illumina MiSeq TruSeq Cancer Panel (48 genes, 212 amplicons, ≥ 500× coverage) in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratory. PTEN was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: From March 2012 to April 2014, 245 patients were enrolled. At least one mutation was found in 54% (97/178) and 91% (61/67) of patients using MassArray or MiSeq platforms, respectively (P <.01). Of all patients, KRAS G12/13 mutation was identified in 39%, and non-G12/13 KRAS, BRAF, or NRAS mutations were present in 9%, 6%, and 4%, respectively. Other common mutations included TP53 (68.7%), APC (41.8%), and PIK3CA (13.5%). Co-mutation with KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF was found in 75% of patients with PIK3CA mutation. Of 106 patients with known PTEN immunohistochemistry status, 16% were negative. A higher average number of mutations were observed in right versus left colorectal cancer (P <.01), with 13 of 14 BRAF mutations located in right colon cancer. Conclusion: Mutations are common in advanced colorectal cancer. Right colon cancers harbor more genetic aberrations than left colon or rectal cancers. These aberrations may contribute to differential outcomes to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy among patients with right colon, left colon, or rectal cancers. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinical-colorectal-cancer.com-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Colorectal Cancer-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.subjectBRAF-
dc.subjectGenomic profiling-
dc.subjectKRAS-
dc.subjectMutation-
dc.subjectRight colon cancer-
dc.titleMolecular profiling of patients with advanced colorectal cancer: Princess Margaret Cancer Centre experience-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChiu, WYJ: jwychiu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, WYJ=rp01917-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clcc.2017.10.010-
dc.identifier.pmid29128266-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85034568314-
dc.identifier.hkuros283267-
dc.identifier.volume17-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage73-
dc.identifier.epage79-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000426490300011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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