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Article: EBV Infection and Glucose Metabolism in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

TitleEBV Infection and Glucose Metabolism in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherSpringer New York LLC.
Citation
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 2017, v. 1018, p. 75-90 How to Cite?
AbstractTo establish persistent infection in cells, viruses evolve strategies to alter host cellular pathways to regulate cell proliferation and energy metabolism which support viral infection. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) undergoes both lytic and latent infection to achieve persistent and lifelong infection in human. EBV readily infects human B cells, driving their transformation to proliferative lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), and eventually establishes lifelong latent infection in memory B cells. In contrary, EBV undergoes lytic replication upon infection into normal epithelial cells which is essential for the replication of EBV genome and production of infectious viral particles for transmission through saliva. EBV shuttles between B cells and epithelial cells to complete its infection cycle. EBV infection is closely associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and is present in practically 100% of undifferentiated NPC. In contrast to undergo lytic infection of normal pharyngeal epithelium, EBV establishes latent infection in NPC. The switch from lytic infection to latent infection may represent an early and essential step in the development of NPC. Recent studies in both B cells and NPC cells latently infected with EBV reveal alterations in cell metabolism to support persistent and latent EBV infection. Events underlying the switching of lytic to latent EBV infection in NPC cells are largely undefined. Molecular events and alterations of cell metabolism are likely to play crucial roles in switching EBV infection from lytic to latent in NPC cells. Latent EBV infection and expression of viral genes, including LMP1, LMP2, and possibly EBV-encoded micro RNAs, may play essential roles in alterations of cell metabolism to support NPC pathogenesis. Alteration of energy metabolism is an essential hallmark of cancer. The role of altered energy metabolism in host cells in modulating latent and lytic EBV infection in NPC cells is unclear. In this review, we will discuss the impact of genetic alterations in NPC to module cellular metabolism and its influence on latent infection and lytic reactivation of EBV infection in NPC cells. In particular, the role of EBV-encoded genes in driving glucose metabolism and their contribution to NPC pathogenesis will be discussed. This new perspective on the interplay between EBV infection and altered host metabolic pathways in NPC pathogenesis may offer novel and effective therapeutic strategies in the treatment of NPC and other EBV-associated malignancies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/249562
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.45
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.887

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZHANG, J-
dc.contributor.authorJia, LJ-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, CM-
dc.contributor.authorTsao, GSW-
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-21T03:03:56Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-21T03:03:56Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 2017, v. 1018, p. 75-90-
dc.identifier.issn0065-2598-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/249562-
dc.description.abstractTo establish persistent infection in cells, viruses evolve strategies to alter host cellular pathways to regulate cell proliferation and energy metabolism which support viral infection. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) undergoes both lytic and latent infection to achieve persistent and lifelong infection in human. EBV readily infects human B cells, driving their transformation to proliferative lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), and eventually establishes lifelong latent infection in memory B cells. In contrary, EBV undergoes lytic replication upon infection into normal epithelial cells which is essential for the replication of EBV genome and production of infectious viral particles for transmission through saliva. EBV shuttles between B cells and epithelial cells to complete its infection cycle. EBV infection is closely associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and is present in practically 100% of undifferentiated NPC. In contrast to undergo lytic infection of normal pharyngeal epithelium, EBV establishes latent infection in NPC. The switch from lytic infection to latent infection may represent an early and essential step in the development of NPC. Recent studies in both B cells and NPC cells latently infected with EBV reveal alterations in cell metabolism to support persistent and latent EBV infection. Events underlying the switching of lytic to latent EBV infection in NPC cells are largely undefined. Molecular events and alterations of cell metabolism are likely to play crucial roles in switching EBV infection from lytic to latent in NPC cells. Latent EBV infection and expression of viral genes, including LMP1, LMP2, and possibly EBV-encoded micro RNAs, may play essential roles in alterations of cell metabolism to support NPC pathogenesis. Alteration of energy metabolism is an essential hallmark of cancer. The role of altered energy metabolism in host cells in modulating latent and lytic EBV infection in NPC cells is unclear. In this review, we will discuss the impact of genetic alterations in NPC to module cellular metabolism and its influence on latent infection and lytic reactivation of EBV infection in NPC cells. In particular, the role of EBV-encoded genes in driving glucose metabolism and their contribution to NPC pathogenesis will be discussed. This new perspective on the interplay between EBV infection and altered host metabolic pathways in NPC pathogenesis may offer novel and effective therapeutic strategies in the treatment of NPC and other EBV-associated malignancies.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. -
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.titleEBV Infection and Glucose Metabolism in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJia, LJ: ljia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, CM: annatsan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsao, GSW: gswtsao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, CM=rp01964-
dc.identifier.authorityTsao, GSW=rp00399-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-981-10-5765-6_6-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85032007750-
dc.identifier.hkuros283176-
dc.identifier.volume1018-
dc.identifier.spage75-
dc.identifier.epage90-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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