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Article: Mental health and health-related quality of life of Chinese college students who were the victims of dating violence

TitleMental health and health-related quality of life of Chinese college students who were the victims of dating violence
Authors
KeywordsStress
Dating violence
Depression
Quality of life
Chinese
Anxiety
Issue Date2017
Citation
Quality of Life Research, 2017, v. 26, n. 4, p. 945-957 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the mental health and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of Chinese college students who were the victims of dating violence. Methods: Six hundred and fifty-two subjects were included in the data analysis. Subjects completed a structured questionnaire containing the Woman Abuse Screening tool, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the 10-item version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Instrument (WHOQOL-BREF). Results: Analysis by independent t test suggested that victims of dating violence had more severe depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms and poorer HRQOL than non-victims. Multiple linear regression models found that more severe dating violence victimization was associated with more severe depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms. The mediation analysis found that after simultaneously controlling for the degree of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms, the direct effect between dating violence severity and HRQOL, as measured by overall HRQOL and the global health, physical and environment domains of the WHOQOL-BREF, was statistically insignificant, supporting a full-mediation model. The relationship between dating violence severity and the social domain of HRQOL was partially mediated by the degree of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms. Conclusion: Victims of dating violence had poorer mental health and HRQOL than non-victims. The study findings affirm the importance of assessing depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms in victims and the need to improve their depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms to diminish the negative effects of dating violence, which are apparent in their HRQOL.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248988
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.392
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.158
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Edmond P.H.-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Janet Y.H.-
dc.contributor.authorFong, Daniel Y.T.-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-27T05:58:48Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-27T05:58:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationQuality of Life Research, 2017, v. 26, n. 4, p. 945-957-
dc.identifier.issn0962-9343-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248988-
dc.description.abstract© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the mental health and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of Chinese college students who were the victims of dating violence. Methods: Six hundred and fifty-two subjects were included in the data analysis. Subjects completed a structured questionnaire containing the Woman Abuse Screening tool, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the 10-item version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Instrument (WHOQOL-BREF). Results: Analysis by independent t test suggested that victims of dating violence had more severe depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms and poorer HRQOL than non-victims. Multiple linear regression models found that more severe dating violence victimization was associated with more severe depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms. The mediation analysis found that after simultaneously controlling for the degree of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms, the direct effect between dating violence severity and HRQOL, as measured by overall HRQOL and the global health, physical and environment domains of the WHOQOL-BREF, was statistically insignificant, supporting a full-mediation model. The relationship between dating violence severity and the social domain of HRQOL was partially mediated by the degree of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms. Conclusion: Victims of dating violence had poorer mental health and HRQOL than non-victims. The study findings affirm the importance of assessing depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms in victims and the need to improve their depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms to diminish the negative effects of dating violence, which are apparent in their HRQOL.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofQuality of Life Research-
dc.subjectStress-
dc.subjectDating violence-
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.subjectQuality of life-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectAnxiety-
dc.titleMental health and health-related quality of life of Chinese college students who were the victims of dating violence-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11136-016-1413-4-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84988729698-
dc.identifier.hkuros271001-
dc.identifier.volume26-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage945-
dc.identifier.epage957-
dc.identifier.eissn1573-2649-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000396063100014-

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