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Conference Paper: 'Eat for FUN' parenting workshop

Title'Eat for FUN' parenting workshop
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
HKSBH  How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Objectives: To develop and evaluate a set of parenting program workshops entitled “Eat for FUN” that to promote age-appropriate food choices and feeding practices to support the development of independent eating in children.incorporated components on parental skills on handling child’s mealtime behaviors and making healthy food choices for the children. Design: Two workshops were developed. One is for parents/caregivers with 6-12 months child (“infant workshop”) and another one for parents/caregivers with 18-36 months child (“toddler workshop”). Each workshop consisted of two 2-hour sessions, which were delivered on a weekly basis by experienced nurse and dietitian. A quasi-experimental time-series design was used for evaluation. Participants completed questionnaires at pre-, post-workshop and one month following the workshop. Setting: Maternal and Child Health Centres and non-governmental organizations. Participants: Infant workshop targeted parents/caregivers with 6-12 months child; while toddler workshop targeted parents/caregivers with 18-36 months child. Main outcome measures: Child feeding knowledge, self-efficacy in applying child feeding skills, daily child feeding practices, perception of child feeding Results: There were 85 and 73 participants completed the infant workshop and toddler workshop respectively with return of both pre and the first post questionnaires. Overall, participants’ knowledge score on child feeding and healthy food choices of participants increased after the workshops (p<0.05). Perceived self-efficacy in applying various child feeding skills increased (p<0.05). Daily child feeding practices and a few perceptions of child feeding changed in a favorable direction (p<0.05). Further Sub-analysis for 99 participants who completed all questionnaires at pre-, post-workshop and one month following the workshopof the second post questionnaires collected one month after the workshop among 99 out of 158 participants who completed both the pre and post questionnaires showed that child feeding knowledge and self-efficacy couldan be generally sustained and (p>0.05), and some favorable feeding practices maintained changed in a favorable direction. at one month following the workshop. Conclusions: The “Eat for FUN” workshops are feasible to enhance the awareness of healthy food choices and the adoption of appropriate feeding practices among parents with young children. A more rigorous study design is warranted to examine the long-term impact of such program on disease risk reduction and obesity prevention in Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248831

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RUTH-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, S-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, WY-
dc.contributor.authorIp, F-
dc.contributor.authorTso, K-
dc.contributor.authorSobko, T-
dc.contributor.authorSea, N-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, J-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:49:13Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:49:13Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationHKSBH -
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248831-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Objectives: To develop and evaluate a set of parenting program workshops entitled “Eat for FUN” that to promote age-appropriate food choices and feeding practices to support the development of independent eating in children.incorporated components on parental skills on handling child’s mealtime behaviors and making healthy food choices for the children. Design: Two workshops were developed. One is for parents/caregivers with 6-12 months child (“infant workshop”) and another one for parents/caregivers with 18-36 months child (“toddler workshop”). Each workshop consisted of two 2-hour sessions, which were delivered on a weekly basis by experienced nurse and dietitian. A quasi-experimental time-series design was used for evaluation. Participants completed questionnaires at pre-, post-workshop and one month following the workshop. Setting: Maternal and Child Health Centres and non-governmental organizations. Participants: Infant workshop targeted parents/caregivers with 6-12 months child; while toddler workshop targeted parents/caregivers with 18-36 months child. Main outcome measures: Child feeding knowledge, self-efficacy in applying child feeding skills, daily child feeding practices, perception of child feeding Results: There were 85 and 73 participants completed the infant workshop and toddler workshop respectively with return of both pre and the first post questionnaires. Overall, participants’ knowledge score on child feeding and healthy food choices of participants increased after the workshops (p<0.05). Perceived self-efficacy in applying various child feeding skills increased (p<0.05). Daily child feeding practices and a few perceptions of child feeding changed in a favorable direction (p<0.05). Further Sub-analysis for 99 participants who completed all questionnaires at pre-, post-workshop and one month following the workshopof the second post questionnaires collected one month after the workshop among 99 out of 158 participants who completed both the pre and post questionnaires showed that child feeding knowledge and self-efficacy couldan be generally sustained and (p>0.05), and some favorable feeding practices maintained changed in a favorable direction. at one month following the workshop. Conclusions: The “Eat for FUN” workshops are feasible to enhance the awareness of healthy food choices and the adoption of appropriate feeding practices among parents with young children. A more rigorous study design is warranted to examine the long-term impact of such program on disease risk reduction and obesity prevention in Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHKSBH -
dc.title'Eat for FUN' parenting workshop-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailSobko, T: tsobko@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySobko, T=rp01843-
dc.identifier.hkuros281879-

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