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Conference Paper: Personal preventive measures for patients with different symptoms of influenza-like illness

TitlePersonal preventive measures for patients with different symptoms of influenza-like illness
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherSchool of Public Health.
Citation
Transmission conference 2017 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction Influenza viruses affect 5-15% of the population annually and cause a broad spectrum of disease severity. Handwashing and wearing face masks are common preventive measures against transmission in the community. Our study investigated how different influenza-related symptoms would affect preventive measures. Methods We conducted a longitudinal study with 4 rounds of telephone interviews. We collected data on symptom profile and the corresponding personal preventive measures. We used generalized estimating equations to assess the effect of different symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI) and their combinations on preventive measures taken. Results We interviewed 3249 participants contributing to 8722 responses over 4 rounds. 3592 responses reported having any ILI-related symptoms and 22.2% of them have taken preventive measures. Of these, 49.9% and 53.9% increased frequency of handwashing and wearing mask, respectively. Younger subjects (aged 0-15y) were more likely to wash their hands (adjusted odds ratio, aOR = 2.4, 95% CI=1.6-3.7), but less likely to wear masks (aOR = 0.3, 95% CI=0.2-0.6). Subjects with fever plus cough (aOR = 6.2, 95% CI=3.6-10.8), fever plus runny nose (aOR = 2.6, 95% CI=1.6-4.2), or fever plus sore throat (aOR = 3.4, 95% CI=2.2-5.3) were more likely to increase frequency of handwashing, while subjects with fever plus cough (aOR = 21.5, 95% CI=11.3-40.6), fever plus runny nose (aOR = 12.5, 95% CI=7.6-20.8) fever plus sore throat (aOR = 10.5, 95% CI=6.6-16.6), cough plus runny nose (aOR = 3.3, 95% CI=1.6-6.9), or cough plus sore throat (aOR = 2.4, 95% CI=1.7-3.4) were more likely to wear face masks. However, subjects with runny nose plus sore throat were less likely to increase frequency of washing hand (OR = 0.4, 95% CI=0.2-0.9) or wearing mask (OR = 0.2, 95% CI=0.1-0.5). Discussion Understanding factors affecting preventive measures may help to refine public health messages during influenza season to targeted population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248216

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Q-
dc.contributor.authorWong, OL-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, KO-
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKM-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorLau, EHY-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:39:42Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:39:42Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationTransmission conference 2017-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/248216-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Influenza viruses affect 5-15% of the population annually and cause a broad spectrum of disease severity. Handwashing and wearing face masks are common preventive measures against transmission in the community. Our study investigated how different influenza-related symptoms would affect preventive measures. Methods We conducted a longitudinal study with 4 rounds of telephone interviews. We collected data on symptom profile and the corresponding personal preventive measures. We used generalized estimating equations to assess the effect of different symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI) and their combinations on preventive measures taken. Results We interviewed 3249 participants contributing to 8722 responses over 4 rounds. 3592 responses reported having any ILI-related symptoms and 22.2% of them have taken preventive measures. Of these, 49.9% and 53.9% increased frequency of handwashing and wearing mask, respectively. Younger subjects (aged 0-15y) were more likely to wash their hands (adjusted odds ratio, aOR = 2.4, 95% CI=1.6-3.7), but less likely to wear masks (aOR = 0.3, 95% CI=0.2-0.6). Subjects with fever plus cough (aOR = 6.2, 95% CI=3.6-10.8), fever plus runny nose (aOR = 2.6, 95% CI=1.6-4.2), or fever plus sore throat (aOR = 3.4, 95% CI=2.2-5.3) were more likely to increase frequency of handwashing, while subjects with fever plus cough (aOR = 21.5, 95% CI=11.3-40.6), fever plus runny nose (aOR = 12.5, 95% CI=7.6-20.8) fever plus sore throat (aOR = 10.5, 95% CI=6.6-16.6), cough plus runny nose (aOR = 3.3, 95% CI=1.6-6.9), or cough plus sore throat (aOR = 2.4, 95% CI=1.7-3.4) were more likely to wear face masks. However, subjects with runny nose plus sore throat were less likely to increase frequency of washing hand (OR = 0.4, 95% CI=0.2-0.9) or wearing mask (OR = 0.2, 95% CI=0.1-0.5). Discussion Understanding factors affecting preventive measures may help to refine public health messages during influenza season to targeted population.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSchool of Public Health. -
dc.relation.ispartofTransmission conference 2017-
dc.titlePersonal preventive measures for patients with different symptoms of influenza-like illness-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailWong, OL: iolwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, EHY: ehylau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, OL=rp01806-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, DKM=rp00256-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EHY=rp01349-
dc.identifier.hkuros281710-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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